Fox News Politics

Former Vice President Joe Biden defended bipartisanship with Republican lawmakers, saying if a Democratic president can’t find compromise might as well “go home” and start a “real physical revolution.”

Speaking at the Poor People’s Campaign summit on Monday, the Democratic frontrunner was asked by MSNBC host Joy Reid about how he would handle a GOP-controlled Senate headed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has vowed to halt progressive legislation.

“Joy, I know you’re one of the ones that thinks it’s naive to think we have to work together,” Biden responded. “The fact of the matter is if we can’t get a consensus, nothing happens except the abuse of power by the executive.”

The former Delaware senator expressed how it sometimes takes a “brass knuckle fight” and reflected how he successfully campaigned during the 2018 midterms to help flip the House in favor of Democrats.

TRUMP DISMISSES BIDEN’S 2020 CHANCES, KNOCKS HIS ‘MENTAL CAPACITY:’ ‘EVERYBODY KNOWS HE DOESN’T HAVE IT’

BIDEN LEADS TRUMP BY 10 POINTS IN NEW FOX NEWS NATIONAL POLL

“You have to go out and beat these folks if they don’t agree with you by making your case,” Biden explained. “And that’s what presidents are supposed to do, persuade people, move the public as to what’s going on.”

Biden then argued that there’s always a “rationale for compromise” with Republicans, pointing to the Obama-era Recovery Act where he boasted “three Republican votes” that he garnered in order to get it passed.

“If you start off with the notion there’s nothing you can do, well, why don’t you all go home then?” Biden continued. “Or let’s start a real physical revolution if you’re talking about it. Because we have to be able to change what we’re doing within our system.”

BIDEN HOLDS EDGE OVER TRUMP IN SOLIDLY RED TEXAS: POLL

He later told the crowd that you “can shame people to do things the right way.”

At the same event, Biden predicted he can win states no Democrat has won in presidential elections in decades.

“I plan on campaigning in the South. I plan on — if I’m your nominee — winning Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, believe it or not,” Biden said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

No Democrat has carried South Carolina in a presidential election since Jimmy Carter more than four decades ago. Biden, who has developed deep ties over the years in the state where he often vacations, enjoys a large lead over his primary rivals in the state’s crucial first-in-the-South presidential primary.

Source: Fox News Politics

Former Vice President Joe Biden boldly predicts he can win states no Democrat has won in presidential elections in decades.

“I plan on campaigning in the South. I plan on — if I’m your nominee — winning Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, believe it or not,” Biden vowed Monday, as he spoke at a gathering in the nation’s capital of the Poor People’s Campaign’s Moral Action Congress.

BIDEN LEADS TRUMP BY 10 POINTS IN NEW FOX NEWS NATIONAL POLL

No Democrat has carried South Carolina in a presidential election since Jimmy Carter more than four decades ago. Biden, who has developed deep ties over the years in the state where he often vacations, enjoys a large lead over his primary rivals in the state’s crucial first-in-the-South presidential primary.

But capturing the conservative state in a general election would be a high hurdle. Republicans have won the state in every presidential election dating back to 1968, except for Carter’s victory in 1976.

No Democrat has won Georgia since Bill Clinton in 1992. And other than Barack Obama’s victory in 2008, North Carolina has been solidly in the GOP column in each presidential election dating back to 1968.

Biden, the clear front-runner right now in the race for the Democratic nomination, also has his eyes on two more states President Trump carried in 2016.

“I believe we can win Texas and Florida, if you look at the polling data now,” he said.

While Florida is a crucial battleground state – Obama captured it in 2008 and 2012 but Trump won the state’s 29 electoral votes in 2016 – Texas is solidly red. Carter’s 1976 victory was the last time a Democratic nominee won Texas.

But a Quinnipiac University Poll conducted in late May and earlier this month indicated Biden with a slight 48-44 percent edge over Trump in a hypothetical 2020 general election match-up.

BIDEN HOLDS EDGE OVER TRUMP IN SOLIDLY RED TEXAS: POLL

And a new public opinion survey by the University of Texas and the Texas Tribune suggested that voters were split on whether they’d support Trump for re-election.

Democrats in the Lone Star State are also energized by now-presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke’s near upset of Republican Sen. Ted Cruz in last year’s midterm elections.

Biden made his comments after he was asked if he would spend significant time campaigning in the South and winning support from poor white, black and Latino voters.

THE LATEST ON THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION FROM FOX NEWS

The Poor People’s Campaign is steered the Rev. William Barber II, the black religious leader in the nation’s capital. His gatherings have become a must-stop for the 2020 White House hopefuls.

In his opening remarks, Biden took aim at the president, saying Trump’s created a climate where different classes and races are looking for scapegoats to blame for their own struggles.

“The charlatans have been able to pit black folks against white folks against Latinos, etc.,” Biden declared.

The former vice president called that brand of divisive politics “a bunch of malarkey.”

But Biden warned that “the exploitation is more extreme than it’s ever been because [of] the gigantic income inequality that exists here in America. It’s greater than at any time since the turn of the last century.”

Biden also made a pitch for universal access to Medicaid.

He proposed that “every single person in the United States has access to Medicaid right off the bat.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Rep. Seth Moulton didn’t make the stage for the opening two rounds of Democratic presidential primary debates, but he’s still heading to Miami next week, where the first showdowns will be held.

And while he’s downplaying the significance of those debates, he took some shots Monday at the Democratic National Committee as he vowed not to let the “political establishment” pick the party’s 2020 nominee.

MOULTON: ‘IMAGINE IF WE HAD A PRESIDENT WHO UNDERSTOOD ENGLISH’

“At the end of the day a bunch of people in Washington at the DNC, part of the political establishment, are not going to determine who’s the best nominee to take on Trump. I think that that is clear. As I’ve gone around the country, I certainly haven’t heard people say all hail the DNC and that establishment in Washington, they’ve really got everything figured out,” Moulton told Fox News during a campaign stop in New Hampshire, the state that holds the first primary in the White House race.

Twenty candidates made the cut for the lead-off debates, but the congressman from Massachusetts and Marine combat veteran who served four tours of duty in the Iraq War was one of just three White House contenders who didn’t reach the DNC’s thresholds to take part.

“I’m not going to cry over spilled milk. They have their rules,” Moulton said Monday.

But he added, “the DNC and their Miami debate is not going to decide who voters are going to choose to be our nominee in February of next year.”

Regardless, Moulton’s headed to Miami.

“We’re going to do some press around it to share my story. What we found is that the more people I get in front of, the more my experience with service and my approach to this race has resonated with the American people. So it’s a simple fact that there’s going to be a lot of people there from the media who’ve asked to speak to me,” Moulton told Fox News.

Moulton was first elected to Congress in 2014, after upsetting then-longtime Rep. John Tierney in a Democratic primary fight. And the 40-year old congressman was one of the ringleaders of last year’s failed push by some House Democrats to prevent Nancy Pelosi from regaining the speaker’s gavel.

He said his fight for a “new generation of leadership” is what sets him apart from many of the other younger rivals running for the Democratic nomination.

“There are people who are talking about a new generation of leadership. I’ve been fighting for it ever since I got to Congress and I’m going to keep that fight going to stand up for Americans on the ground over the political establishment,” he said, in an apparent jab at some of the other Democratic White House hopefuls.

Last month, Moulton opened up about seeking treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder after his combat deployments in Iraq. The congressman made his disclosure as he unveiled a plan to expand military mental health services.

Sunday, another rival for the nomination – South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg – disclosed in an interview with Axios that he suffered depression after returning from a tour of duty in Afghanistan.

“I’m glad he’s following my lead because we need more people to be willing to talk about mental health,” Moulton highlighted. “And I’ve shared my story in the hopes that more people would share theirs.”

Source: Fox News Politics

The Constitution does not provide authority to the “administrative realm” in Washington, according to Professor John Marini.

Marini said on “Life, Liberty & Levin” Sunday that the Washington bureaucracy is a very prevalent part of government that has its own type of authority,

“There is absolutely no authority for the administrative realm in the Constitution. Every authority that is in the Constitution is a political authority, so it derives either from the legislative, executive or judicial powers,” the professor claimed.

MARK PENN: IF TRUMP PROBED NADLER, SCHIFF THE WAY THEY CONDUCT INVESTIGATIONS ON HIM, HE’D BE IMPEACHED

“The administrative state is such a pervasive phenomenon that most people think of it simply as the bureaucracy,” he said.

“But it’s really much more pervasive than that because it not only is established in the institutions that are created by government, but it also has a kind of authority.”

Levin told Marini he considers him an expert on the bureaucracy – “on what they call ‘the swamp’.”

“If we have this army – this swamp, who makes up this… massive administrative state?” he asked.

Marini claimed many of the people working within the bureaucracy are specially trained by U.S. colleges in any number of fields of concentration.

“Typically, the people that are in the bureaucracies are those who are trained in the universities in certain specialized areas. The American university is in a certain way really the keystone of the administrative state,” the Claremont Institute fellow said.

“Almost every major in college is utilized by government in one form or another. Because as it takes on more and more decision-making in social life… those decisions that used to be in civil society are put into the hands of bureaucrats.”

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The professor criticized Congress for allowing the administrative state to usurp some of its powers.

He said politicians at times, “defer to that authority and it relieves them of making the kind of political decisions that they need to make about things like making laws. When Congress delegates laws to bureaucracies it’s no longer deliberating. It’s no longer doing what lawmaking was intended to do, which is public deliberation.”

“And for Congress to give that up is a terrible thing for a democracy.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren said she’s “very concerned about a slide towards war with Iran” and highlighted that President Donald Trump “has to come to Congress” for authorization before taking military action against Iran.

Pointing to this week’s attacks on tankers in the Gulf of Oman, the President told Fox News on Friday that “Iran did do it.”

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON RISING US-IRAN TENSIONS

But Warren, the two-term progressive senator from Massachusetts who sits on the Senate Armed Services Committee, is skeptical.

“I want to see whatever evidence the administration says that it has,” she said Friday evening while campaigning in New Hampshire, the state that holds the first primary in the White House race.

“I’m very concerned about a slide towards war with Iran.”

And Warren emphasized: “I want to remind this administration that the administration cannot declare war on its own. It has to come to Congress and make that case and ask for an authorization for a use of military force. That’s not politics, that’s a point of the Constitution of the United States of America.”

TANKER CREW DETAINED BY IRAN AFTER FIRST BEING RESCUED BY ANOTHER VESSEL: US OFFICIALS

The president, in a wide-ranging interview on Fox and Friends, pointed towards the attacks on the tanks and said, “we don’t take it lightly.”

“Iran did do it and you know they did it because you saw the boat,” he said, before pointing to video that showed an Iranian vessel removing an unexploded mine attached to a Japanese-owned oil tanker.

Trump said the mine had “Iran written all over it.” But he said that Iran had been damaged since he took office, but was still a threat.

“They’re a nation of terror and they’ve changed a lot since I’ve been president, I can tell you,” Trump added.

Warren, a vocal Trump critic, pointed to the president’s removal of the U.S. from a nuclear treaty it and European allies signed with Tehran under President Barack Obama.

“Part of the problem we’ve got right now is that the president backed out of a deal that the United States had committed to and he does it with no coherent alternative strategy,” she noted.

And Warren argued that Trump’s been inconsistent when it comes to his positions towards Iran.

GULF TANKER ATTACK: IRAN HAS FORM FOR USING CLINGY, COVERT ‘LIMPET MINES’ WHICH INSTANTLY DISABLE VESSELS

“He’s continued to poke at Iran but then back off. At one point we hear an announcement there’s going to a huge troop buildup, then no troop buildup,” she explained. “It’s not possible to tell where the president is headed and if we can’t tell that here in the United States, it means our Congress can’t fulfill its Constitutional function. But it also means it’s hard for the Iranians to read and the rest of the world to read.”

Warren was campaigning in New Hampshire on the same day that the lineup was announced for the upcoming first round of Democratic presidential primary debates, which are coming up later this month.

Twenty of the record two-dozen candidates will make the stage for the debates – with 10 appearing on two consecutive nights, on June 26-27.

Warren is the only one of the top five polling candidates who will appear on the first night, with former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, and Sen. Kamala Harris all taking part in the second night’s showdown.

Warren said she wasn’t concerned, saying “there will be other opportunities” to share the debate stage with the other top polling contenders for the nomination.

“This is going to be fun,” she added.

And Warren, who’s risen in the polls the past two months, touted her retail politics metrics in New Hampshire and the other early voting primary and caucus states.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“I’ve done more than 90 town halls, taken more than 2,000 questions, we’re crowding in on about 30,000 selfies now,” she highlighted.

Source: Fox News Politics

A federal appeals court ruled against a Trump administration “blanket ban” that prevents young illegal immigrants from getting abortions once they cross the border.

Under the policy, introduced in 2017, shelters holding immigrant teens in government custody were not allowed to give children access to abortions. The policy was blocked by a judge in 2018; the judge said the government could not deny minors the right to make reproductive decisions, a ruling that was again upheld on Friday by a three-judge panel in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.

TEEN VOGUE COLUMN INSTRUCTING MINORS HOW TO GET ABORTION WITHOUT PARENTAL CONSENT CALLED ‘DISGUSTING’

The court’s decision upholds the Supreme Court’s right to an abortion granted by Roe v. Wade.

“We are unanimous in rejecting the government’s position that its denial of abortion access can be squared with Supreme Court precedent,” the panel opinion says.

The American Civil Liberties Union, which brought the case against the administration and represents several pregnant minors seeking abortions, responded to the court’s decision in a statement on Twitter.

“The Trump administration’s cruel policy of blocking immigrant women from accessing abortion in federal custody was a blatant abuse of power. We’re relieved that today’s ruling continues to prevent the policy from taking effect while the case proceeds as a class action,” the ACLU tweeted.

Laurence Silberman, one of the judges on the panel who was appointed to the bench by former President Ronald Reagan, wrote a dissent saying that he did not support a class-action lawsuit by the ACLU.  He also argued that officials should have a limited window to transfer a minor out of government custody to the care of a sponsor, where the child could then obtain an abortion without the government’s assistance.

The administration has two options to appeal the decision; asking the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to hear the case or taking its challenge to the Supreme Court.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“We will continue fighting to make sure that the Trump administration is permanently blocked from obstructing young immigrant minors’ access to crucial health care and the constitutional right to abortion,” the ACLU said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Source: Fox News Politics

A federal appeals court ruled against a Trump administration “blanket ban” that prevents young illegal immigrants from getting abortions once they cross the border.

Under the policy, introduced in 2017, shelters holding immigrant teens in government custody were not allowed to give children access to abortions. The policy was blocked by a judge in 2018; the judge said the government could not deny minors the right to make reproductive decisions, a ruling that was again upheld on Friday by a three-judge panel in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.

TEEN VOGUE COLUMN INSTRUCTING MINORS HOW TO GET ABORTION WITHOUT PARENTAL CONSENT CALLED ‘DISGUSTING’

The court’s decision upholds the Supreme Court’s right to an abortion granted by Roe v. Wade.

“We are unanimous in rejecting the government’s position that its denial of abortion access can be squared with Supreme Court precedent,” the panel opinion says.

The American Civil Liberties Union, which brought the case against the administration and represents several pregnant minors seeking abortions, responded to the court’s decision in a statement on Twitter.

“The Trump administration’s cruel policy of blocking immigrant women from accessing abortion in federal custody was a blatant abuse of power. We’re relieved that today’s ruling continues to prevent the policy from taking effect while the case proceeds as a class action,” the ACLU tweeted.

Laurence Silberman, one of the judges on the panel who was appointed to the bench by former President Ronald Reagan, wrote a dissent saying that he did not support a class-action lawsuit by the ACLU.  He also argued that officials should have a limited window to transfer a minor out of government custody to the care of a sponsor, where the child could then obtain an abortion without the government’s assistance.

The administration has two options to appeal the decision; asking the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to hear the case or taking its challenge to the Supreme Court.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“We will continue fighting to make sure that the Trump administration is permanently blocked from obstructing young immigrant minors’ access to crucial health care and the constitutional right to abortion,” the ACLU said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Source: Fox News Politics

A federal appeals court ruled against a Trump administration “blanket ban” that prevents young illegal immigrants from getting abortions once they cross the border.

Under the policy, introduced in 2017, shelters holding immigrant teens in government custody were not allowed to give children access to abortions. The policy was blocked by a judge in 2018; the judge said the government could not deny minors the right to make reproductive decisions, a ruling that was again upheld on Friday by a three-judge panel in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.

TEEN VOGUE COLUMN INSTRUCTING MINORS HOW TO GET ABORTION WITHOUT PARENTAL CONSENT CALLED ‘DISGUSTING’

The court’s decision upholds the Supreme Court’s right to an abortion granted by Roe v. Wade.

“We are unanimous in rejecting the government’s position that its denial of abortion access can be squared with Supreme Court precedent,” the panel opinion says.

The American Civil Liberties Union, which brought the case against the administration and represents several pregnant minors seeking abortions, responded to the court’s decision in a statement on Twitter.

“The Trump administration’s cruel policy of blocking immigrant women from accessing abortion in federal custody was a blatant abuse of power. We’re relieved that today’s ruling continues to prevent the policy from taking effect while the case proceeds as a class action,” the ACLU tweeted.

Laurence Silberman, one of the judges on the panel who was appointed to the bench by former President Ronald Reagan, wrote a dissent saying that he did not support a class-action lawsuit by the ACLU.  He also argued that officials should have a limited window to transfer a minor out of government custody to the care of a sponsor, where the child could then obtain an abortion without the government’s assistance.

The administration has two options to appeal the decision; asking the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to hear the case or taking its challenge to the Supreme Court.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“We will continue fighting to make sure that the Trump administration is permanently blocked from obstructing young immigrant minors’ access to crucial health care and the constitutional right to abortion,” the ACLU said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Source: Fox News Politics

Rep. Will Hurd, R-Tex, will no longer be speaking at cyber security conference after critics expressed outrage over his voting record on women’s issues.

Hurd, a former undercover CIA officer and an advocate for cybersecurity on Capitol Hill, was invited to speak at Black Hat, one of biggest cyber security conferences in the country, being held in Las Vegas in August. But Tech Crunch security editor Zach Whittaker highlighted on Thursday what he described was Hurd’s “terrible voting record on women’s rights.” It includes voting against funding for Planned Parenthood, programs supporting women in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) fields, and his support on restricting late-term abortions.

Black Hat initially defended its decision to invite Hurd, saying in a statement “Hurd has a strong background in computer science and information security and has served as an advocate for specific cybersecurity initiatives in Congress,” adding that he will offer a “unique perspective” at the conference.

That did not, however, halt the uproar from the cybersecurity community, with some threatening to pull their involvement in the conference.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

On Friday, Black Hat reversed its decision, saying they “misjudged the separation of technology and politics.”

“Black Hat has chosen to remove U.S. Representative Will Hurd as our 2019 Black Hat USA Keynote. We misjudged the separation of technology and politics,” Black Hat told Tech Crunch. “We will continue to focus on technology and research, however we recognize that Black Hat USA is not the appropriate platform for the polarizing political debate resulting from our choice of speaker,”

Black Hat vowed that the conference is “still fully dedicated to providing an inclusive environment and apologize that this decision did not reflect that sentiment.”

Rep. Hurd’s office did not immediately respond to Fox News for comment.

Source: Fox News Politics

MIAMI — Rural counties across Florida are struggling to meet a state mandate to offer bilingual ballots to all its voters in time for March 2020 primary.

Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican, issued the order in April, surprising officials in smaller counties who said that they did not have the money or resources to comply.

The directive requires that the state’s 67 counties make voting accessible to Spanish speakers by offering non-English ballots, sample ballots and voting material. The order came after a lawsuit was filed by several Latino and civil rights organizations, arguing that 32 counties were violating the Voting Rights Act because they had large Latino populations but didn’t offer Spanish-language ballots to its voters.

The judge ruled in favor of the groups, forcing the counties to comply. The governor’s directive covers the other 22 counties not covered by the court order.

Florida has over two million Hispanic registered voters, according to the Florida Division of Elections.

Florida has over two million Hispanic registered voters, according to the Florida Division of Elections. (Elina Shirazi/Fox News)

At least 13 counties, including Broward, which includes Fort Lauderdale, and Orange, which includes Orlando, already have bilingual ballots because they have large minority populations and must abide by federal law.

Miami-Dade County has trilingual ballots because it also has a large Haitian population that speaks Creole.

On the road to the White House, Hispanics will be critical voters in a crucial swing state. The state’s already large Latino population increased significantly after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, prompting millions of the island’s residents to flee to Florida.

State officials want to make sure those Puerto Ricans, who are American citizens, can and do vote.

“[It’s] a recognition of the growth of the Latino or Hispanic population in the state,” said Eduardo Gamarra, a political science professor at Florida International University.

DeSantis’ decision provoked an immediate backlash, especially across rural counties with few Hispanics.

Wesley Wilcox, the elections supervisor in Central Florida’s Marion County, where the Hispanic population is about 6 percent, said the mandate will hurt many areas.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Miami-Dade County is one of thirteen counties already using bilingual ballots.

Miami-Dade County is one of thirteen counties already using bilingual ballots. (Elina Shirazi/Fox News)

“It is a concern, especially for those jurisdictions that are much more fiscally constrained than some of the others. In the November 2018 election, the ballot in Marion County with all the amendments and everything fit on one sheet of paper. Well, that is no longer going to be the case. We are going to have two sheets of paper,” Wilcox said.

Wilcox said complying with the order will cost the county $100,000, including mailing and printing costs.

“You know, all my ‘vote here’ signs that I’ve had,” he said, “we are redoing those.”

In Monroe County, which includes Key West, officials said they do not know how they will be able to comply with the order — but they are trying.

“We do what we are told, but it is going to be costly,” said Monroe Supervisor of Elections Joyce Griffin. “Everything has to be newly printed and there is no way getting around that. It can be done, but it will be difficult to find bilingual poll workers. We can’t use high school Spanish speakers, they have to really know how to speak it fluently, have an intelligent conversation. Also, we don’t have as many Hispanics as we used to.”

But others welcomed the move in a state where 2 million of the 13 million eligible voters are Hispanic.

Many newcomers who come from Spanish-speaking regions say they already find the voting process complex and confusing. Not being able to understand the ballot adds to the challenge.

“I am from Puerto Rico. I voted in the last election in the state of Florida. I speak Spanish better … I need a ballot in dual English and Spanish,” said Sheraly Gonzalez, a Puerto Rican voter.

Gamarra, the political science professor, said Gonzalez is not alone.

“Hispanics are now becoming voters, and they are becoming voters across the state,” Gamarra said.

In the November 2016 General Election, Census estimates that 1.55 million Hispanics in Florida reported voting in that election.

In the November 2016 General Election, Census estimates that 1.55 million Hispanics in Florida reported voting in that election. (Elina Shirazi/Fox News)

Latino rights groups in Florida say these voters need a chance to exercise a fundamental American right.

“We do have 25 percent of the population who are Spanish speaking and when you have over 45 percent of the counties not having language access for the election, it is a problem,” said Yanidsi Velez, the Florida state director for the Hispanic Federation.

Political analysts say getting Hispanics to the polls in 2020 is critical for both the Democratic and Republican parties. President Trump narrowly won Florida in the 2016 presidential election.

“The vote of a few thousand might even turn around a major electoral result. And so, you know, from the perspective of either party I think it’s a great move and something that might be tried elsewhere, especially where you have this new influx of voters,” Gamarra said.

More and more counties across the nation are offering non-English ballots. Florida is one of three states, along with California and Texas, where a large number of counties provide Spanish-language ballots, according to Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan fact tank.

Other states with large minority populations, like California and Texas, already provide Spanish translations in some capacity.

Other states with large minority populations, like California and Texas, already provide Spanish translations in some capacity. (Elina Shirazi/Fox News)

DeSantis said Florida needs to guarantee that every voter understands how they’re voting and for whom they’re voting.

“It is critically important,” the governor said when announcing his order, “that Spanish-speaking Floridians are able to exercise their right to vote without any language barriers.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Get ready for a political fistfight at the first Democratic debates.

Front-runners Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders will end up sharing the debate stage in Miami later this month, along with heavy-hitting rivals Kamala Harris and Pete Buttigieg, according to the line-up announced Friday.

The first debate of the Democratic primary season will be split into two nights given the size of the field. But despite apparent efforts to avoid the impression of the event being divided into a main event and ‘kids’ table,’ the final line-up ends up putting most high-polling candidates on the stage on the second night.

Former Vice President Biden, Sens. Sanders, I-Vt., and Harris, D-Calif., and South Bend Mayor Buttigieg are four of the five highest-polling candidates in recent national and early-voting state polling. The fifth, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., will appear on stage with another crowd of candidates the first night.

But the roster could make for some serious fireworks on the second night, as Sanders — who’s making his second straight White House run — has increasingly criticized Biden, the clear front-runner right now at this early point in the Democratic nomination race.

BIDEN HITS BACK AT SANDERS REPEATED CRITICISM

Sanders and his campaign have repeatedly blasted Biden for holding top-dollar fundraisers, with the candidate indirectly slamming the former vice president for attending “fundraiser hosted by a corporate CEO on the Las Vegas strip.”

And Sanders campaign spotlighted that Biden was rubbing elbows with “high-dollar functions hosted and attended by corporate lobbyists.”

The Democratic National Committee will have 10 candidates on stage on consecutive nights, June 26-27, in Miami. NBC, the DNC’s media partner for the first round of debates, announced the line-ups after holding a lottery-type event at Rockefeller Center in New York City.

Joining Biden and Sanders will be Harris and Buttigieg, a one-time long-shot for the nomination who’s surged in recent months. Buttigieg has also indirectly questioned Biden over his age.

Also joining are Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York and Michael Bennet of Colorado, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, Rep. Eric Swalwell of California, entrepreneur Andrew Yang and best-selling spiritual author Marianne Williamson.

Warren, whose poll numbers have jumped in recent weeks, will be the highest-polling candidate on the first night — which could help her raise her profile even further, but also denies her the opportunity to take on the front-runners directly.

Joining her will be Sens. Cory Booker of New Jersey and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas, Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee, former Housing and Urban Development secretary and former San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, Reps. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii and Tim Ryan of Ohio, former Rep. John Delaney of Maryland and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio.

NBC divided the 20 contenders who qualified for the first two rounds of DNC debates into two groups – those polling at 2 percent or higher, and those under 2 percent. Through a random selection, the upper and lower tier groups were split between the two nights of debate.

They divvied up the upper- and lower-tier candidates to avoid the format used during the 2016 GOP presidential primaries, when the large field of nearly 20 candidates was divided into two groups, with the higher-polling candidates facing off against each other, and a smaller group of lower- polling candidates placed in what was derided as the “kids’ table.” But through the random selection, most of the highest-polling candidates will still appear on one night.

WHICH 2020 DEMOCRATS WON’T MAKE THE DEBATE STAGE

The DNC on Thursday announced the 20 candidates that had qualified. The thresholds for the first two rounds of debates – the second round will be held in late July in Detroit – were announced by the DNC in January. They include reaching 1 percent in three polls recognized by the national party committee, or receiving contributions from a minimum 65,000 unique donors as well as 200 unique donors in at least 20 states

Failing to qualify were Gov. Steve Bullock of Montana; Rep. Seth Moulton of Massachusetts; and Miramar, Fla., Mayor Wayne Messam.

Since jumping into the race in late April, Biden’s increasingly taken incoming fire from Sanders, Warren, and just this week, from O’Rourke, who argued “we cannot return to the past. We cannot simply be about defeating Donald Trump.”

O’ROURKE TARGETS BIDEN FOR BEING A ‘RETURN TO THE PAST’

Biden’s been criticized for his past support of free trade deals, for his 2002 vote in support of the Iraq War, and for taking an alleged “middle ground” approach to combating climate change.

Asked if he would return fire, Biden last week told Fox News: “I think the worst thing we could do is get into a match where we’re going after each other in the Democratic Party. So I’m going to try my best not to be negative relative to my opponents.”

And pointing to Republican President Trump, he emphasized that “just like I’m not going to go down to Trump’s level when he starts his attacks, I’m not going to go down to anybody else’s level when they start attacks.”

But Biden said he would respond at times to “set the facts straight.” He added, “I’ll respond to assertions. I’m not likely to go and point out what they’re doing, which is sometimes different than what they say.”

Source: Fox News Politics

A House hearing on reparations for slavery is set for next Wednesday, which marks the first time in more than a decade that a panel will consider slavery’s “continuing impact” on the country and the next steps to “restorative justice.”

The scheduled hearing held before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties will feature testimonies from writer Ta-Nehisi Coates and actor Danny Glover.

The purpose of the panel is said to “examine, through open and constructive discourse, the legacy of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade.”

OCASIO-CORTEZ CALLS FOR ‘AGENDA OF REPARATIONS’ AS 2020 DEMS GET ON BOARD

Former Democratic Rep. John Conyers of Michigan first proposed that Congress study reparations in 1989 after he sponsored a bill, House Resolution 40, that he reintroduced every session until he resigned in 2017.

Democratic Texas Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, the bill’s new sponsor, introduced it earlier this year and pushed for next week’s hearing. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said that she supports a reparations study, which has not been the subject of a hearing since 2007.

The topic of reparations reemerged to national prominence as several 2020 Democratic presidential candidates signaled their support for some form of compensation for the descendants of slaves. None, however, seemed to support compensation in the traditional sense of direct payouts to black Americans.

Instead, candidates have proposed somewhat vague ideas such as using funds to create policies addressing economic inequalities that could disproportionately benefit African-Americans.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Anita Hill said “of course” she would be willing to vote for former Vice President Joe Biden if he were the Democratic nominee despite their bitter history during the confirmation battle of Supreme Court Justice Clarance Thomas.

In her first television interview since Biden launched his candidacy, Hill expressed her desire for political leaders to say “what happened in 1991 will never happen again” and acknowledged the parallels between her experience and the 2018 experience of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who had accused Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault when they were in high school during his confirmation.

“Did you identify with Dr. Christine Blasey Ford?” NBC News’ Andrea Mitchell asked.

ANITA HILL SLAMS BIDEN IN OP-ED, CLAIMS DEM MIGHT HAVE SLOWED #METOO BY DECADES

“I definitely did identify with her because It was still that intense pressure from this group of panelists on the committee who didn’t seem to understand the issue of sexual harassment at all,” Hill responded, later confirming she had been in contact with Dr. Ford.

Hill believed that Biden’s handling of the confirmation hearing should not disqualify him from the presidency and even suggested that she could vote for him next year.

“Could you conceive of voting for Joe Biden if he turns out to be the Democratic nominee against Donald Trump?” Mitchell asked.

ANITA HILL SAYS FEMALE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE ‘ARE NOT BEING TAKEN SERIOUSLY’

“Of course I could,” Hill answered.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Biden’s campaign took heat following its launch after it was reported that he had contacted Hill to apologize for the hearing just weeks before he announced his candidacy.

Source: Fox News Politics

Harvard Law Professor Alan Dershowitz said on Thursday he would back former Vice President Joe Biden over President Trump if the two were facing off in the general election next year.

During an interview on SiriusXM, Dershowitz told “The Dan Abrams Show” that when it comes to his vote in 2020, he will evaluate the “totality” of Trump’s record in office and how a Democratic nominee like Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-VT, would “present a real dilemma” for him.

“You’re not going to vote for Donald Trump, are you?” Abrams asked.

“It depends who runs against him,” Dershowitz said. “If Bernie Sanders is nominated, that would present a real dilemma for me.”

“And what if the candidate is Joe Biden?” Abrams followed.

“I’m a strong supporter of Joe Biden,” Dershowitz said. “I like Joe Biden. I’ve liked him for a long time and I could enthusiastically support Joe Biden.”

“Over Donald Trump?” Abrams responded.

“Over Donald Trump, yeah,” Dershowitz clarified.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Dershowitz was recently praised by Trump during his interview with ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos.

Source: Fox News Politics

Kellyanne Conway, a top aide to President Trump, violated the Hatch Act on “numerous occasions,” according to the Office of Special Counsel.

Particularly, in March 2018, investigators faulted Conway for appearances on Fox News and CNN, during which she discussed the special Alabama House race. The Hatch Act “restricts employees from using their official government positions for partisan political purposes, including by trying to influence partisan elections,” a previous report stated.

Now the federal watchdog agency is recommending Trump fire the longtime White House employee for being a “repeat offender.” It’s the first time the group has ever requested the removal of a White House official over Hatch Act violations.

“Ms. Conway’s violations, if left unpunished, send a message to all federal employees that they need not abide by the Hatch Act’s restrictions. Her actions erode the principal foundation of our democratic system — the rule of law,” Special Counsel Henry Kerner wrote in a letter to the president this week.

SPECIAL COUNSEL RECOMMENDS FIRING KELLYANNE CONWAY OVER ALLEGED HATCH ACT VIOLATIONS

White House Counsel Pat Cipollone told Kerner the recommendation was “outrageous.”

“[It’s] based on multiple fundamental legal and factual errors, makes unfair and unsupported claims against a close adviser to the President, is the product of a blatantly unfair process that ignored statutory notice requirements and has been influenced by various inappropriate considerations,” Cipollone stated in a letter, which was obtained by Fox News.

Read on for a look at what the Hatch Act regulates.

What is the Hatch Act?

Enacted in 1939, the Hatch Act bars federal employees from participating in political activity while on duty, in the workplace or in an official capacity.

The law also includes some state and local government employees who work in connection with federally funded programs, according to the OSC, an independent federal investigative and prosecutorial agency

“The law’s purposes are to ensure that federal programs are administered in a nonpartisan fashion, to protect federal employees from political coercion in the workplace, and to ensure that federal employees are advanced based on merit and not based on political affiliation,” OSC states.

Does the law cover social media?

Yes. In fact, the agency states that email and social media have made it easier for federal employees to violate the Hatch Act.

While federal employees are allowed to engage in conversations and express opinions on partisan issues or candidates on social media, they are not allowed to do so while on duty or in the workplace. Employees are also not allowed to use their job titles while engaging in such conversations.

Federal employees are also barred from soliciting political contributions at any time – including sharing links to contribution pages for candidates or partisan organizations.

Employees are still subjected to the Hatch Act even when using an alias on social media.

The OSC says a federal employee is allowed to receive partisan political emails and is even allowed to forward such an email to a personal account. But a federal employee is not allowed to send such an email – from a personal or government account – to others while at work.

A partisan political email is defined as “an email that is directed at the success or failure of a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race.”

What happens if you violate the Hatch Act?

Someone who violates the Hatch Act could be subjected to a fine up to $1,000. The employee could also face other disciplinary actions, ranging from a reprimand to removal from federal service.

What are some examples of it being violated?

Julian Castro: OSC said Julian Castro, then the housing and urban development secretary under President Barack Obama, violated the Hatch Act when he discussed Hillary Clinton during a 2016 interview with Yahoo News, according to Politico.

“In responding to a journalist’s question about the 2016 election, I offered my opinion to the interviewer after making it clear that I was articulating my personal view and not an official position,” Castro said in a statement. “At the time, I believed that this disclaimer was what was required by the Hatch Act. However, your analysis provides that it was not sufficient.”

No punishment was recommended.

USPS: The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) violated federal law after it allowed its employees to participate in union-funded campaign work for various Democratic candidates while on leave from the agency, a 2017 Office of Special Counsel report said.

As Fox News reported, the OSC, an independent federal investigative and prosecutorial agency, found that the USPS “engaged in systemic violations” of the Hatch Act – a federal law that limits what political activities federal employees are allowed to engage and participate in.

Federal employees are allowed to participate in some political work while on leave, but the OSC said USPS showed “bias” in favoring the union’s 2016 campaign operation. The report said USPS workers were allowed to do union-funded campaign work for former presidential contender Hillary Clinton and other Democratic candidates.

The report recommended that USPS management shouldn’t require, direct or suggest local supervisors release union members to engage in political activity in the future.

Kellyanne Conway: Kellyanne Conway, a top aide to President Trump, violated the Hatch Act during two different television appearances, according to the Office of Special Counsel.

The investigators’ report faults Conway for appearances on Fox News and CNN, during which she discussed the 2017 Alabama special election for U.S. Senate.

A summary of an investigation into Conway stated that beginning in February, Conway engaged in a pattern of partisan attacks on Democratic presidential candidates. She called Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey “sexist” and a “tinny” motivational speaker. In another interview, she accused Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts of “lying” about her ethnicity and “appropriating somebody else’s heritage.” And she attacked former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas for not thinking the women running “are good enough to be president.” It also cited her description of former Vice President Joe Biden as lacking “vision.”

The summary also noted that she used her Twitter account to conduct political activity. For example, she retweeted a March 31 message that referred to Biden as “Creepy Uncle Joe” and “took it upon herself to outline other faults she found in Mr. Biden’s candidacy,” the report said.

The White House has maintained Conway’s innocence.

White House spokesman Steven Groves called the agency’s decision “unprecedented” and “deeply flawed” and said it violated Conway’s constitutional rights to free speech and due process.

“Its decisions seem to be influenced by media pressure and liberal organizations — and perhaps OSC should be mindful of its own mandate to act in a fair, impartial, non-political manner, and not misinterpret or weaponize the Hatch Act,” Groves said in a statement.

Fox News’ Kaitlyn Schallhorn, Jennifer Earl, Jon Decker, Alex Pappas, Brooke Singman and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang is breaking with his primary rivals who say they would support a DOJ investigation into whether President Trump obstructed justice if they win the White House in 2020.

“If you look around the world, one pattern that America should seek to avoid is prosecuting past leaders and presidents and imprisoning them,” Yang told Fox News on Thursday. “That’s something that America has never fallen into and that’s the way I would hope that we proceed with me in the White House.”

The New York City entrepreneur — whose campaign platform includes giving each adult American $1,000 a month as a part of a universal basic income – made the comments while campaigning in New Hampshire, the state that holds the first primary in the race for the White House.

HARRIS SAYS IF ELECTED, SHE’D SUPPORT A DOJ INVESTIGATION INTO TRUMP

California Democratic Sen. Kamala Harris, a rival for the nomination, said this week she believes the only reason Special Counsel Robert Mueller didn’t recommend prosecuting Trump was because of the Justice Department’s policy against indicting a sitting president. In an interview with NPR, Harris said that once out of office, Trump would be subject to charges – and she suggested the Justice Department in a Harris presidency would pursue them.

“I believe that they would have no choice and that they should, yes,” Harris said.

Another 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg, said this week that if elected president, he could also support a Justice Department criminal investigation into Trump.

“To the extent that there’s an obstruction case, then yes, DOJ’s got to deal with it,” Buttigieg said in an interview with The Atlantic published Thursday.

But Buttigieg added that he would only take such a step if there was a “credible allegation.”

YANG NOW GIVING $1,000 A MONTH TO ANOTHER VOTER

In his interview with Fox News, Yang also commented on Trump’s controversial comments that he’d accept damaging information on a 2020 election opponent provided by a foreign source. The president’s admission that he would accept a foreign power’s assistance in the 2020 election and that he might not report it the FBI – made in an interview with ABC News on Wednesday – was assailed by Democrats and even some GOP lawmakers.

Yang said “it’s simultaneously both shocking and unsurprising. And it certainly lends credence to the fact that he was both open just that sort of thing during the 2016 election. So it’s very distressing to the American people. The goal, though, should be focusing on getting him out of the office in 2020 as fast as possible and that’s what I’m working towards.”

Mueller spent two years investigating any possible collusion between the 2016 Trump campaign and Russia to sway the election toward the GOP nominee at the expense of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

But Yang didn’t bite when asked if Trump’s new comments should prompt the Democratic majority in the House of Representatives to begin impeachment proceedings against Trump.

“Let the people in Congress focus on whether or not this behavior rises to the level of impeachment while I’m focusing on beating him in the ballot box in 2020,” Yang said.

Source: Fox News Politics

Like most of his rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination, Julian Castro’s looking for a moment to stand out.

And the former San Antonio, Texas mayor — who later served as Housing and Urban Development secretary during President Barack Obama’s second term — will have another chance to break through as he headlines a Fox News town hall in Phoenix Thursday night.

WATCH FOX NEWS TOWN HALL WITH CASTRO 6:30 PM ET THURSDAY

“Special Report” host Bret Baier and “The Story” host Martha MacCallum will moderate the one-hour event live starting at 6:30 p.m. ET.

“I think in a 23-candidate field, any opportunity that you have on national television in a highlighted way is positive,” Castro said in an interview.

The candidate said he’s looking forward to talking about issues ranging from immigration to health care to the economy.

Another topic he may address is his new plan to overhaul policing in the U.S.

“My plan is a reflection of a system that’s broken. An epidemic of mistreatment, particularly of young black men in our country,” he said.

Castro is among a large pack of candidates averaging just around 1 percent in the latest national and early primary and caucus state polls.

He’s far behind former Vice President Joe Biden, the clear front-runner right now in the Democratic nomination race, as well as Sens. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Kamala Harris of California, and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

JULIAN CASTRO BY THE NUMBERS

Ahead of the first round of official primary debates, Castro is the latest 2020 Democratic White House hopeful to take part in a Fox News town hall, following Sanders, Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, Buttigieg, and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York.

He sees an opportunity.

“I said at the beginning of my campaign that I want to be a president for all Americans. And If I want to be a president for all Americans, I’m going to campaign in front of all Americans. So, I see this as an opportunity to reach an audience that I may not always get in front of.”

“A lot of people in the audience watching may see things differently than me. But it’s important for me to speak to them as well because one of the things that’s been sorely missing over the last couple of years has been a president who’s been willing to engage the other side. And this is the beginning of the conversation for me,” Castro explained

And targeting the White House, he contrasted his policing plan with the current administration’s approach. “The Trump Administration has completely ignored this problem. At the same time, this is a problem that we’ve had for many, many years. It’s not a new problem. And in the Obama administration, we were making progress. We were addressing it, holding communities like Chicago more accountable for the way they did their policing,” he said.

Castro said that his plan “is about making sure that we hold police departments and police officers accountable for misconduct, that we end over-aggressive policing and that we work to try and mend the divide that too often exists between the police and certain communities.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee is stepping up his push to force the Democratic National Committee to hold a primary debate solely on the issue of climate change.

“This planet is on fire and we have to have a debate on how to put it out,” the Democratic presidential candidate and longtime champion of combating climate change told reporters.

INSLEE UNVEILS $9 TRILLION PLAN TO COMBAT CLIMATE CHANGE

And Inslee warned that if the DNC doesn’t drop its opposition to a climate change-only debate, he will “be talking to the other candidates” who agree with him and “we will pursue what other options we can make.”

Inslee made his comments Wednesday while campaigning in New Hampshire, which holds the first primary in the race for the White House.

Inslee, a long-shot for the nomination in an historically large field of two-dozen candidates, has been aggressively and relentlessly urging the DNC and the national party committee’s chairman Tom Perez to hold a climate change debate.

DEBATE OVER DEBATE: SOME 2020 DEMS FUME OVER DNC CRITERIA TO MAKE THE STAGE

Perez reportedly told activists who confronted him at a party gathering in Florida this past weekend that holding such a debate was “just not practical.”

Inslee, firing back, added “I’ll tell you what’s impractical. It’s to be underwater, under eight feet of water as a farmer in Iowa. To have your town burned down in Paradise, California.”

And the governor emphasized that “there’s 12 debates. One of them ought to be dedicated to this effort. I’m not just saying that. Hundreds of thousands of Democrats are. It’s the right thing to do and I hope the party will reconsider.”

“There are nine state party chairs who are going to bring a resolution at the next executive committee to make sure this gets done,” he noted.

And Inslee pointed to numerous rivals, including former Vice President Joe Biden, the clear front-runner right now in the Democratic nomination race, who’ve joined his calls for a climate change debate.

“There are about 14 of the candidates, including the former vice president. The former vice president said we need a debate on this yesterday. So I would encourage the chair of the party to listen to the former vice president and hundreds of thousands of grassroots folks and party chairs and me and make sure this gets a full and fair debate,” he said.

THE LATEST FOX NEWS STORIES ON CLIMATE CHANGE

Perez, in a Medium post on Tuesday, defended his climate change record while steering the DNC the past two years.

“Climate change is an urgent threat to our nation and our planet,” he wrote. “It imperils our children and grandchildren’s future, and it disproportionately affects our most vulnerable communities. That’s why, beginning in 2017, I made clear to our media partners that the issue of climate change must be featured prominently in our debates. That didn’t happen in 2016 — and it was wrong.”

But in explaining his opposition to Inslee’s push, Perez said “if we change our guidelines at the request of one candidate who has made climate change their campaign’s signature issue, how do we say no to the numerous other requests we’ve had? How do we say no to other candidates in the race who may request debates focused on an issue they’ve made central to their own campaigns?”

And he pointed to other options to spotlight the issue of climate change.

“Already, a number of organizations and networks have hosted their own issue-based forums and town halls — and I hope and expect more of these will take place in the coming months,” Perez emphasized. “Nobody is prohibited from participating in a DNC-sanctioned debate because they participated in a climate change forum or town hall.”

While Inslee twice gave Biden a shout-out for joining the calls for a climate change debate, he targeted the former vice president’s efforts on the issue.

Inslee, who last week said that Biden’s new proposal to produce net-zero emissions and reach a 100 percent clean energy economy by 2050 lacks “teeth,” criticized the former vice president again.

“I am the only candidate who has said this has to be the first priority of the United States. I am the only candidate who has said that. He (Biden) has not,” Inslee told Fox News.

“I’m the only candidate who has said we have to get off coal with … teeth in a law in the next ten years. He has not. I’m the only candidate who has said we need to make our transportation system electric in the next decade and a half. He has not,” Inslee spotlighted. “So there are some differences.”

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump has reportedly discussed the possibility of backing a primary challenger to Republican Rep. Justin Amash who came out in favor of impeaching the president over the Mueller Report’s findings weeks ago.

Trump has mulled potential support of challenger State Rep. Jim Lower with several people, including Vice President Mike Pence and North Carolina Rep. Mark Meadows. Lower has a 16-point lead in a recent poll, Politico reported.

JUSTIN AMASH GONE FROM HOUSE FREEDOM CAUCUS AFTER SAYING TRUMP’S CONDUCT WAS ‘IMPEACHABLE’

On Monday, Amash and Meadows made a mutual decision he would leave the House Freedom Caucus, which they co-founded, because he didn’t want to be a “distraction.”

Betsy DeVos’ family, who are one of the richest and most influential in Michigan, decided to end their years-long support of Amash just two weeks ago and their decision could influence other donors to leave the Michigan representative, according to Politico.

Amash has been meticulous and vocal in laying out his case for impeachment, calling some of Trump’s actions “inherently corrupt.” The president, in return, has derided Amash as a “loser” and a “lightweight.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Neither the White House nor Amash have commented on the report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-VT, continued to defend Democratic socialism and argued that Americans would be “delighted to pay more in taxes” if his policies are carried out.

On Wednesday, Sanders attempted to sway voters into the ideology of Democratic socialism and argued in favor for what he called an “Economic Bill of Rights,” where every American would have a right for items like free health care and education. He also insisted that President Trump is a “corporate socialist” for providing billions in subsidies and tax breaks for corporations.

During an appearance on CNN, the Democratic candidate was asked how he will respond to Trump’s attacks on the campaign trail, specifically when the president invokes Venzuela as an example of failed socialism.

“Look, what we have to understand, for example… the United States is the only major country on Earth not to guarantee health care to all people as a right,” Sanders explained. “In many countries in Europe, Germany for one, you go to college and the cost of college is zero. I think in Finland they actually pay you to go to college. In most countries around the world the level of income and wealth inequality, which in the United States today is worse than at anytime since the 1920s… that level of income and wealth inequality is much less severe than it is right here in the United States.”

“But as you know, the taxes in many of those countries are much higher than they are- the individual and personal tax, are much higher than they are in the United States,” Cooper told the 2020 candidate.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Yeah, but I suspect that a lot of people in the country would be delighted to pay more in taxes if they had comprehensive health care as a human right,” Sanders claimed. “I live 50 miles away from the Canadian border. You go to the doctor any time you want. You don’t take out your wallet. You have heart surgery, you have a heart transplant, you come out of the hospital, it costs you nothing. Your kids in many countries around the world can go to the public colleges and universities tuition-free, wages in many cases are higher.”

He continued, “So there is a trade-off, but at the end of the day, I think that most people will believe they going to be better off when their kids have educational opportunities without out-of-pocket expenses, when they have healthcare as a human right, when they have affordable housing, when they have decent retirement security, I think most Americans will understand that is a good deal.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Maine became the eighth state in the U.S. to legalize medically assisted suicide after Democratic Gov. Janet Mills signed the bill into law on Wednesday.

The state House passed the bill by just one vote, 73-72, on Monday and the Senate narrowly approved the bill, 19-16, on Tuesday despite both chambers being controlled by Democrats.

The new law, known as the Death With Dignity Act, has been proposed several times in Maine yet failed in a statewide vote and seven times in Congress. It defines “terminal disease” as one that is incurable and will likely cause a person’s death within six months.

MAINE ASSISTED-SUICIDE BILL REACHES GOVERNOR’S DESK; WOULD BE 8TH STATE TO LEGALIZE OPTION FOR TERMINALLY ILL

Maine Gov. Janet Mills signs a bill Wednesday that makes hers the eighth state to allow terminally ill people to end their lives with prescribed medication. (AP Photo/Marina Villeneuve)

Maine Gov. Janet Mills signs a bill Wednesday that makes hers the eighth state to allow terminally ill people to end their lives with prescribed medication. (AP Photo/Marina Villeneuve)

Physicians will be required to get a second medical opinion and have requests made at least twice verbally and once in writing by patients before patients can be administered lethal doses of life-ending medication. Patients would also be screened for depression or other conditions that could impair their judgment in deciding their fate.

“The opportunity for someone of sound mind facing imminent death to avoid further suffering is viewed by some purely as an act of personal liberty, a decision with which government should not interfere,” Mills said in a statement Wednesday justifying her decision to sign the bill into law.

“Assisted suicide public policy leaves those who already struggle to access health care – the poor, the terminally ill, persons living with disabilities, people of advanced age, and those living in remote areas — at a much higher risk for abuse, coercion and mistakes,” Matt Valliere, executive director of Patients Rights Action Fund, told Fox News on Thursday.

The law safeguards against patient mistreatment and doctor malpractice by criminalizing coercing someone to request assisted suicide or forging a request for life-ending medication.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

California, Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, New Jersey and Washington, D.C., all have similar legislation for medically assisted suicide in their states, according to the Death With Dignity National Center and the Death With Dignity Political Fund.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Source: Fox News Politics

Bernie Sanders on Wednesday delivered a no-apologies address embracing and defending “democratic socialism,” as he unveiled what he dubbed an “economic bill of rights” to deal with an economy he claims is “fundamentally broken and grotesquely unfair.”

The longtime independent senator from Vermont – who’s running a second straight time for the Democratic presidential nomination – sought to counter President Trump’s claims of a booming economy as he delivered his most detailed public explanation to date of why he brands himself a democratic socialist.

SEVERAL 2020 DEMS LEAD TRUMP IN NEW POLL

Calling his beliefs a path of “justice and love” while painting a bleak picture of the country’s current economic conditions, Sanders said that “income and wealth inequality today in the United States is greater than at any time since the 1920s.”

In a speech heavy on FDR references that called for finishing the work of the New Deal, Sanders cast his policies as a necessary counter to “right-wing” forces.

“The challenge we confront today as a nation, and as a world, is in many ways not different from the one we faced a little less than a century ago, during and after the Great Depression in the 1930s. Then, as now, deeply rooted and seemingly intractable economic and social disparities led to the rise of right-wing nationalist forces all over the world,” he said.

SANDERS DOWNPLAYS SOVIET UNION, VENEZUELA AS SOCIALISM EXAMPLES

The speech represented for Sanders a defiant embrace of an ideology that has not only raised questions about his general election appeal but has been used as a brush by the Trump campaign to paint the entire Democratic field as far-left. Indeed, many of Sanders’ primary rivals have adopted his democratic socialism-inspired policies like “Medicare for all,” though some of those same candidates have avoided the ideological label.

However, Sanders, like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, has made no apologies about being a democratic socialist.

And on Wednesday, he fired back at Trump and other Republicans for trying to use “socialism” as a “slur.”

“While President Trump and his fellow oligarchs attack us for our support of democratic socialism, they don’t really oppose all forms of socialism,” Sanders charged. “They may hate democratic socialism because it benefits working people, but they absolutely love corporate socialism that enriches Trump and other billionaires.”

Taking a direct shot at Trump, Sanders claimed that the difference between himself and the president is that “he believes in corporate socialism for the rich and powerful.”

Sanders also called Trump a “demagogue” and accused him up trying to “divide people up and legislate hatred” to deflect attention from “real crises.”

The senator, one of the leaders right now in the race for the Democratic nomination, said that the country must reject “that path of hatred and divisiveness — and instead find the moral conviction to choose a different path, a higher path, a path of compassion, justice and love. It is the path that I call democratic socialism.”

The populist senator argued that despite positive overall GDP and stock market numbers, “millions of middle class and working people struggle to keep their heads above water, while the billionaire class consumes the lion’s share of the wealth that we are collectively creating as a nation.”

Sanders explained that he was following in the footsteps of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the Democrat who created Social Security as part of his New Deal during his four terms in the White House during the 1930s and 1940s.

“Today in the second decade of the 21st century we must take up the unfinished business of the New Deal and carry it to completion. This is the unfinished business of the Democratic Party and the vision we together must accomplish,” Sanders said.

And he spotlighted FDR again as he announced his “economic bill of rights,” noting that “in 1944 FDR proposed an economic bill of rights but died a year later and was never able to fulfill that vision. Our job, 75 years later, is to complete what Roosevelt started.”

Punching back against GOP attacks, Sanders noted that Republicans once labeled Social Security a socialist proposal.

But the address is sure to fuel Republicans eager to cast the entire field as sympathetic to a government-heavy, big-spending agenda. Further, it exposes Sanders to more criticism about his past praise decades ago for the Cuban and Soviet regimes, though today the senator has sought to distinguish democratic socialism from socialism practiced by Communist governments.

Ahead of Sanders’ speech, the Republican National Committee called it a “sermon on socialism” as they described “just how extreme Sanders really is.”

And tying Sanders to rest of the nearly two-dozen rivals running for the White House, the RNC charged that “Bernie’s radical views have become mainstream in the Democrat Party.”

It wasn’t just Republicans attacking Sanders.

One of his rivals for the nomination, former Rep. John Delaney of Maryland, also was critical.

Delaney, one of the more moderate candidates, said: “I believe he is wrong. The United States has been an economic and innovation marvel and our national wealth has been good for our citizens and enabled us to be a force of good throughout the world. Socialism — or any new name Senator Sanders has for it — is the wrong answer.”

Former Vice President Joe Biden, who’s been repeatedly attacked by Sanders, didn’t engage.

The clear front-runner in the nomination race right now said Wednesday morning in Iowa prior to Sanders’ speech that “I don’t put a whole lot into the labels. I’m not going to comment on Bernie’s characterization of who and what he is. He’s sincere about what he thinks and I think he should go out and say it.”

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump on Wednesday announced a new defense cooperation between the United States and Poland, saying 1,000 more American service members will be sent to the country as part of a “strategic partnership,” while celebrating Poland’s planned purchase of F-35 Joint Strike Fighter jets from the U.S.

The president said Poland will provide “basing and infrastructure” to support the military presence of about 1,000 American troops in the country.

POLISH ‘FORT TRUMP’ AHEAD? US TROOPS SET FOR DEPLOYMENT

“The Polish government will build these projects at no cost to the United States,” Trump said in the Rose Garden of the White House. “The Polish government will pay for this.”

Earlier in the day, the president said the United States has based tens of thousands of troops in Germany for a “long, long time” and that he probably would move a “certain number” of those personnel to Poland “if we agree to do it.”

Polish leaders have lobbied for additional forces for months and had hoped for a permanent U.S. base they said could be called “Fort Trump.” Eastern European nations have reached out to the U.S. and NATO for greater protection, worrying that they might be the next target of Russia’s military advance.

Trump said Wednesday he’s “very pleased” that Poland has announced its intent to purchase 32 American-made F-35 fighter aircraft. In honor of that possible purchase, a single F-35 flew over the White House on a sunny afternoon.

“Moments ago we witnessed that impressive flyover of this cutting edge, F-35 as it flew over the White House,” the president said.

The president made the comments during a joint Rose Garden press conference with Andrzej Duda, the president of Poland. While the press conference focused on areas of agreement, Trump said he differed with Poland’s efforts to force the country’s Supreme Court justices to retire early.

Also Wednesday, Trump dismissed the suggestion that his administration’s deal with Mexico not to impose tariffs in return for more border protection efforts had been negotiated months ago. “We would have never had a deal with Mexico without imposing tariffs,” Trump said.

And he gave some rare praise to journalists at the White House after a photographer was able to capture some details about the Mexico deal on a folded piece of paper Trump was waving Tuesday.

“I had such respect for you people when I held it up to the sunlight and it was closed and you were able to read it through the sunlight,” Trump said. “That was not anticipated.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Joe Biden told an Iowa crowd Tuesday that he had spent the weekend with his buddy former President Barack Obama to celebrate the high school graduation of his granddaughter and Obama’s daughter.

Maisy Biden graduated from the same elite D.C. high school as Sasha Obama. The girls, like the former president and former vice president, are reportedly best friends.

Biden revealed that the celebration was the reason for his absence from the Iowa Democratic Party’s annual Hall of Fame dinner on Sunday – a detail pounced on by his fellow Democratic contenders for the 2020 presidential election.

“When I saw the program for today, I thought the same thing you all did, which is this: Joe Biden must really not like to travel,” said entrepreneur Andrew Yang, a Democratic candidate.

But Biden shrugged off the criticism Tuesday, admitting that he would “skip inauguration” to be with his family.

JOE BIDEN PROMISES TO ‘CURE CANCER’ IF ELECTED PRESIDENT

“One of my competitors criticized me got not going to Iowa to talk for 5 minutes,” Biden said in Davenport on Tuesday. “My granddaughter was graduating. It was my daughter’s birthday. I would skip inauguration for that.”

Biden and Obama’s friendship is well documented and, at the times, the subject of mockery. Most recently, Biden was ridiculed for tweeting an image of an interlocking “friendship bracelet,” baring his and the former president’s name in honor of Best Friends Day.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

David Axelrod, Obama’s former senior adviser, responded to the tweeting, writing: “This is a joke, right?”

“Fraid not,” read a reply from Bill Kristol.

Fox News’ Edmund DeMarche and Alex Pappas contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.,  is expected to make a speech on Wednesday touting his idea of Democratic socialism, a system promising Medicare-for-all, free public college and a $15-per-hour minimum wage, all of which have caused Republicans to dismiss him as too far to the left.

Sanders is expected to defend these ideals as the “unfinished business” necessary to restore America to Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal era if he’s elected president in 2020.

BERNIE SANDERS, AT COMBATIVE FOX NEWS TOWN HALL, MAKES NO APOLOGIES FOR MAKING MILLIONS

“Over 80 years ago, Franklin Delano Roosevelt helped create a government that made huge progress in protecting the needs of working families,” Sanders, 77, is expected to say, according to an excerpt from his remarks. “Today in the second decade of the 21st century, we must take up the unfinished business of the New Deal and carry it to completion. This is the unfinished business of the Democratic Party and the vision we must accomplish.”

Sanders’ campaign platform will largely hinge on the promise to address the growing wealth inequality and guarantee economic rights that he feels all American’s are entitled to. In January, Sanders proposed a plan that would impose higher estate taxes starting at $3.5 million with a 77 percent rate on billionaire estates.

“We must take the next step forward and guarantee every man, woman and child in our country basic economic rights – the right to quality health care, the right to as much education as one needs to succeed in our society, the right to a decent job, the right to affordable housing, the right to a secure retirement and the right to live in a clean environment,” Sanders said. “We must recognize that in the 21st century, in the wealthiest country in the history of the world, economic rights are human rights.”

The Republican National Committee, in a statement, called him a “self-avowed socialist who wants to double your taxes so the government can take over your health care.”

Sanders, a pioneer for a Medicare-for-all system, believes all Americans should have access to affordable health care through the government.

His remarks are not entirely new, and will largely echo ideas used in his bid for the Democratic nomination in 2018, when he lost to Hillary Clinton, but the political landscape has changed dramatically since that time. In a field of 24 Democratic candidates, Sanders is not the only one touting ideals farther to the left, and he is hopeful it will attract the attention of younger voters.

The 2020 hopeful, who is trailing top Democratic contender, former Vice President Joe Biden by more than 15 points, according to a poll by Real Clear Politics, is expected to slam President Trump in his speech, combating the common criticisms of his Democratic socialist plan.

“They may hate Democratic socialism because it benefits working people,” Sanders said referring to both Republicans and Trump, “but they absolutely love corporate socialism that enriches Trump and other billionaires.”

Sanders and his wife made more than $1 million annually in 2016 and 2017 and paid a 26 percent effective tax on $561,293 in income, according to his recently released tax returns. Sanders donated $10,600 to charity in 2016 and $36,300 in 2017, and $19,000 in 2018, drawing criticism from opponents who view him as hypocritical.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“Overnight, Wall Street became big-government socialists and begged for the largest federal bailout in American history — over $1 trillion from the Treasury and even more from the Fed,” Sanders said, referring to the stock market slump in 2008 that led to an economic crisis and massive job losses. 

“But it’s not just Wall Street which loves socialism — when it works for them. It is the norm across the entire corporate world.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio, appeared to get a reprimand on Tuesday after she read a constituent letter attacking President Trump and his supporters.

After Fudge read the letter, which described Trump as a “gangster” and “sexually condescending to women,” presiding officer Rep. Marc Veasey, D-Texas, reminded her that she couldn’t read other people’s remarks attacking the president.

“The chair will remind members that remarks and debate may not engage in personalities towards the president, including by repeating remarks made elsewhere that would be improper if spoken in the members own words,” Veasy said.

Fudge seemed indignant and appeared to ask what Veasy meant by “personalities.” As she stayed near the front of the chamber, Rep. Larry Bucshon, R-Ind., called her out by asking, “Are we in order or what are we doing?” After Fudge responded to him, Bucschon shot back, “No, you’re out of order.”

‘VIEW’ CO-HOST TOUTS JOHN DEAN’S ‘PARALLELS’ BETWEEN TRUMP AND NIXON SCANDALS: ‘EXACTLY THE SAME’

Fudge’s letter came from Ronald S. Williams, senior pastor and chief executive officer of Mount Zion Fellowship in Ohio. Williams’ letter denounced Trump, calling him a “proven liar” among other things.

His supporters, Williams said, were “either racist, steeped in racist religious beliefs, ignorant, or as my mother used to say, just plain dumb.” Fudge tweeted a video of her reading but didn’t include the exchange with Buschon.

“They have chosen to support a president who has a proven record of being sexually condescending to women, will not oppose the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan and other hate organizations, is indecisive, condescending to anyone who challenges him, and hides behind his Twitter account rather than dealing with the real issues in our country and around the world,” he said, according to Fudge’s reading.

The letter also criticized House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s, D-Calif., reluctance to pursue impeachment proceedings related to Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation.

REP. ILHAN OMAR SLAMS ‘BIGOTED’ TRUMP ADMINISTRATION FOR BARRING PRIDE FLAG FROM FOREIGN EMBASSIES

“Nancy Pelosi is a woman who I respect. However, I do believe her hesitancy to impeach this president is her opinion based upon polls and her belief that it would further polarize the country,” he said. “However, the country is already divided and polarized.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

His comments echoed those of progressives like Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., who argued that the need for impeachment transcended political concerns.

House Democrats on Tuesday voted to effectively hold Attorney General William Barr in contempt of Congress — an attempt to censure him for his refusal to comply with Congressional subpoenas. The approved resolution gave Congress the power to enforce subpoenas in court as well as unilaterally initiate judicial proceedings.

Fox News’ Gregg Re contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

In what could be a preview of next year’s general election campaign for the White House, both President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden will go head to head on Tuesday as they each make stops in Iowa, the state that kicks off the presidential caucus and primary calendar.

And Biden, the clear front-runner right now in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, is using the opportunity to blast the Republican president for threatening tariffs on global trading partners. Warning of the impact it’s had on American farmers and manufacturers, Biden plans to call Trump an “existential threat” to the nation.

BIDEN CRITICIZED BY FELLOW DEMOCRATS FOR LIGHT SCHEDULE

“You know, Donald Trump and I are both in Iowa today. It wasn’t planned that way, but I hope Trump’s presence here will be a clarifying event,” Biden will say during an evening speech in Davenport, according to prepared remarks.

The former vice president’s remarks, released early Tuesday morning by his campaign, contain more than 40 mentions of Trump by name, including some of Biden’s most blistering attacks to date on the president.

“America’s farmers have been crushed by his tariff war with China. No one knows that better than Iowa,” Biden will say. “He thinks he’s being tough. Well, it’s easy to be tough when someone else is feeling the pain.”

And Biden will ask “how many farmers across this state and across this nation have had to face the prospect of losing their business, of losing their farm because of Trump’s tariffs?”

Spotlighting the anxiety he said farmers are feeling, Biden will ask “how many have had to stare at the ceiling at night wondering how they’re going to make it? How many sleepless nights do you think Trump has had over what he’s doing to America’s farmers?”

Answering his own question, the former vice president plans to say “just as many as he had when he stiffed the construction workers and electricians and plumbers who built his hotels and casinos. Zero.” And questioning why the president “just backed off his tariff threat with Mexico because he got some tough new deal,” Biden will say “maybe there’s some secret development yet to be revealed— but based on what we know, it seems more like old wine in new bottles.”

Biden will also argue that “the truth is he’s scared – his economic folks told him his tough talk was about to cost to him Michigan and Ohio and Iowa.”

The president on Friday dropped the latest tariff threat as he announced that the U.S. and Mexico had reached a deal to stem the flow of migrants.

Amid criticism from Democrats, the president tweeted Monday that a “very important” part of the agreement with Mexico would be “revealed in the not too distant future.”

And, in an interview with CNBC, he touted, “If we didn’t have tariffs we wouldn’t have made a deal with Mexico.”

“This is something the U.S. has been trying to get for over 20 years with Mexico. As soon as I put tariffs on the table it was done — it took two days,” he said.

DEBATE OVER THE DEBATES: SOME DEMOCRATS FUME OVER DNC CRITERIA AS CUT OFF LOOMS

The president will be along the western edge of Iowa on Tuesday, visiting a renewable energy facility in Council Bluffs before headlining a state GOP fundraiser in West Des Moines.

Biden will campaign in the eastern part of the crucial caucus state, with stops in Ottumwa and Mt. Pleasant before giving his speech in Davenport. He’s also expected to hammer the president over climate change and health care.

“I believe Trump is an existential threat to America,” Biden will say.

The former vice president’s trip – his second to Iowa since launching his 2020 presidential campaign in late April – comes two days after he skipped the first major cattle call of the year in Iowa.

Biden took some incoming fire for missing the Iowa Democratic Party’s Hall of Fame dinner, which was held Sunday in Cedar Rapids. Nineteen of the nearly two-dozen candidates spoke at the annual gathering.

Speaking Monday night at a fundraiser in the nation’s capital, Biden fired back.

“One of my competitors criticized me for not going to Iowa to talk for 5 minutes,” he said according to a pool report. “My granddaughter was graduating. It was my daughter’s birthday. I would skip inauguration for that.”

And Biden will address the sniping again in his Davenport speech.

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON THE 2020 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

“I guess some folks were surprised I made that choice, but I don’t know why,” he will say. “There are some things more important than running for president — and my daughter and granddaughter are two of them. So I’ll make the same decision every time.”

With seven months to go until the Iowa caucus, Biden remains the front-runner in the Hawkeye State. A Des Moines Register/CNN  poll released Sunday indicates the former vice president with 27 percent support, followed by Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont at 15 percent, Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts at 12 percent, South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg at 10 percent, and Sen. Kamala Harris of California at 9 percent. Everyone else in the field registered at 2 percent or less.

Source: Fox News Politics

Call it the debate before the debates.

With the deadline just a day away for the 2020 White House hopefuls to qualify for the first two rounds of primary debates organized by the Democratic National Committee, some of the candidates still gunning to make the stage are getting increasingly frustrated with the DNC’s criteria.

And with the national party committee recently announcing it will make it harder for the contenders to make the cut for the third and fourth rounds of debates – by raising the thresholds that must be cleared – some of the lower-tier contenders are blasting the DNC for “winnowing the field.”

DNC MAKES IT HARDER FOR CANDIDATES TO MAKE DEBATE STAGE FOR THIRD AND FOURTH ROUNDS

The presidential candidates have until Wednesday to cross one of two thresholds to qualify for the first two rounds, which will be held later this month and in late July.

So far, 14 candidates have reached both the polling and donor criteria, guaranteeing them one of the 20 spots available. But with an historically enormous field of nearly two-dozen contenders, some will fail to make the stage.

Among them is Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, one of the last candidates to jump into the race. His campaign slammed the DNC’s “obscure rules.”

Matt McKenna, a veteran Democratic strategist who’s advising Bullock, told Fox News: “Governor Bullock got in the race late because he was doing something only a handful of people in the field seem to spend any time doing — governing. Because he decided to do his job, 100,000 Montanans have healthcare. If he had to make that decision again, to expand Medicaid or make sure he bent to the DNC’s obscure rules, he wouldn’t do anything differently.”

Also likely not to make the cut is Rep. Seth Moulton of Massachusetts.

“No, I’m not going to make the first debate, but I knew that, getting in so late. But I think that’s OK,” Moulton explained last week on Hugh Hewitt’s nationally syndicated radio show. “This first debate’s going to have 20 people. Folks are barely going to get a chance to speak.”

Trying to downplay missing out on a chance to take part in debates that will be viewed by millions of Americans, Moulton argued that the nomination’s “not going to be decided by the Democratic National Committee in their debates. It’s going to get decided by the American people.”

Also likely to sit out – Miramar, Fla., Mayor Wayne Messam, who’s virtually unknown.

THE LATEST 2020 DEVELOPMENTS FROM FOX NEWS

The thresholds for the first two debates – announced by the DNC in January, include reaching 1 percent in three polls recognized by the national party committee, or receiving contributions from a minimum 65,000 unique donors as well as 200 unique donors in at least 20 states.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York this past weekend became the 14th candidate to reach both criteria, as she passed the 65,000 individual contributors mark.

“They are tough rules to follow, so you’ve got to earn them,” she told Fox News.

The others guaranteed a spot in one of the two back-to-back prime time debates — featuring 10 candidates each night — are former Vice President Joe Biden; Sens. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Kamala Harris of California, Cory Booker of New Jersey, and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota; South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg; former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas; former San Antonio Mayor and former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro; Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii; and Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee.

Joining them on the debate stages are two lesser-known contenders – entrepreneur Andrew Yang and best-selling spiritual author Marianne Williamson.

Reaching one of the two thresholds – the polling criteria – appear to be Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio, Rep. Eric Swalwell of California, former Rep. John Delaney of Maryland, and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio.

But the DNC’s raising the bar to make the third and fourth rounds – which will be held in September and October. Candidates must receive contributions from a minimum 130,000 unique donors, as well as 400 unique donors in at least 20 states. And they must crack at least 2 percent in four polls accepted by the national committee.

The upping of the ante is infuriating those candidates who worked hard just to make the cut for the first two rounds.

“I don’t think the DNC should be winnowing the field early in the process,” Bennet told Fox News last month. “To start winnowing the field this early in the process I think isn’t the best way to go about doing it, because you need a chance for the American people to see you.”

Ryan agreed, telling Fox News “to start winnowing the field this early in the process I think isn’t the best way to go about doing it, because you need a chance for the American people to see you.”

While Ryan added that “it’s probably a little premature to start cutting people off,” he noted that “it is what it is. The rules are what they are. I’m not going to complain about them.”

Also frustrated is Delaney, who’s largely self-financing his campaign.

Last week he wrote a letter to the DNC calling for more transparency in revealing how they determined the criteria.

“The DNC is playing a gate-keeping function and they’re creating a filter to determine which candidates can make their arguments to the American people,” he charged.

Williamson struck a similar note, telling Fox News last month that “I don’t believe the political parties should be gatekeepers. They should be conduits and channels that should serve the process, not design the process.”

Castro, in an interview with Fox News last week, warned that “the DNC needs to be careful about the timing of any type of winnowing that happens…they need to be careful not to do the business that the people themselves are going to do.”

And de Blasio told NY1 on Monday night that “I do hope the DNC remembers that we’re always better off being inclusive.”

For the DNC, grappling with nearly two-dozen candidates is uncharted waters. The Democratic field easily topped the then-record 18 Republicans running for the GOP’s 2016 presidential nomination.

DNC Chairman Tom Perez called the threshold-raising a normal procedure.

“If you can’t run an effective grassroots campaign in the year 2020, in today’s era, you’re not going to be able to win the presidency,” Perez told CBS News. “And what our dual threshold has done is to give additional opportunity to the candidates.”

“What we wanted to do was make sure that we had multiple opportunities where they could present their vision to the American people. And then, as it happens in every primary cycle, you’ve got to demonstrate progress, and that’s what September is about,” he added.

A number of the candidates aren’t arguing with the DNC.

Among them is Klobuchar.

“I’m OK with it,” she told Fox News on Monday, while campaigning in the first-in-the-nation primary state of New Hampshire.

While she highlighted that “I do like to have open, free debates,” the senator suggested that nearly two-dozen candidates may be too overwhelming for primary voters.

“I think that for voters…it’s hard to make a decision when you have so many people in it,” she explained. “I think it is important as we get closer and closer to Iowa and New Hampshire and South Carolina and Nevada, that people are able to choose and listen to the candidates and see them debate each other, not just on consecutive nights.”

It’s not just the debate criteria that’s upsetting some of the candidates. It’s also the issues being debated.

Inslee, who’s made combating climate change the top issue in his presidential campaign, is frustrated that the DNC said no to his pitch to hold a debate solely on global warming.

“This is deeply disappointing,” Inslee said. “The DNC is silencing the voices of Democratic activists, many of our progressive partner organizations, and nearly half of the Democratic presidential field, who want to debate the existential crisis of our time. Democratic voters say that climate change is their top issue.”

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump’s former chief of staff Reince Priebus has officially joined the U.S. Navy.

Priebus, 47, was sworn in by Vice President Mike Pence as an ensign — the lowest ranking officer in the Navy — during a commissioning ceremony on Monday morning.

First reported by the Washington Post, Fox News confirmed in December that Priebus could be joining the military branch as a reserve officer following a recommendation from former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis.

FLASHBACK: REINCE PRIEBUS SELECTED TO JOIN NAVY AS RESERVE OFFICER

In addition to Mattis’ recommendation, a board of officers also chose Priebus as a reserve officer, the Post reported, citing defense officials and a memo.

Forty-two candidates were evaluated in December by a Navy review board, with the ex-chief of staff and four others being “professionally recommended” to join the service. Because Priebus was several years past the age limit of 42, he needed a waiver to join. He also needed to ink a deal admitting to possible career limitations, according to the report.

“Reince’s experience, education, and personality make him an ideal fit to be commissioned into the Navy Reserve,” Mattis wrote in a summer letter obtained by The Post.

Priebus served as Trump’s chief of staff for roughly six months, starting at the beginning of the Trump administration in January 2017. He also served as the chairman of the Republican National Committee from 2011 to 2017.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Priebus was congratulated by Sean Spicer, Trump’s former press secretary who is a reserve officer, and other Republican politicians on Twitter.

Fox News’ Matt Richardson contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Vice President Mike Pence on Monday confirmed that the Trump administration denied requests from U.S. embassies around the world to display a rainbow flag to celebrate LGBTQ Pride Month.

“I’m aware that the State Department indicated that on the flag pole of our American embassies that one flag should fly, and that’s the American flag, and I support that,” Pence told NBC News in an interview released Monday.

WHITE NATIONALIST GROUP INTERRUPTS DETROIT PRIDE EVENT, MEMBERS APPEAR TO URINATE ON ISRAELI FLAG

Pence’s remarks come days after the news outlet first reported that the Trump administration was rejecting requests from U.S. embassies to fly the flag outside — an apparent reversal from the Obama administration.

At least four U.S. embassies — in Israel, Germany, Brazil and Latvia — were reportedly denied permission to fly flags in support of the LGBTQ community.

Vice President Mike Pence called it the "right decision" not to flag Pride flags at U.S. embassies around the world during the month of June.

Vice President Mike Pence called it the “right decision” not to flag Pride flags at U.S. embassies around the world during the month of June. (Getty)

The vice president said that he and Trump are “proud to be able to serve every American, and we both feel that way very passionately.”

MILO YIANNOPOULOS NAMED GRAND MARSHAL OF BOSTON’S ‘STRAIGHT PRIDE’ PARADE

“But when it comes to the American flag pole and American embassies around the world, having one American flag fly, I think is the right decision,” Pence said. “We put no restrictions on displaying any other flags or any other displays at our embassies beyond that.”

The Obama administration granted blanket approval to fly the flag on outside flagpoles, NBC News reported, but State Department policy is that embassies are expected to ask for permission from Washington.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Just before the start of Pride — which is celebrated throughout the month of June — President Trump tweeted support for the LGBT community.

“As we celebrate LGBT Pride Month and recognize the outstanding contributions LGBT people have made to our great Nation, let us also stand in solidarity with the many LGBT people who live in dozens of countries worldwide that punish, imprison, or even execute individuals on the basis of their sexual orientation.”

The president added: “My Administration has launched a global campaign to decriminalize homosexuality and invite all nations to join us in this effort!”

The German embassy, one of those that reportedly applied for permission to fly a Pride flag, is headed by Ambassador Richard Grenell, the most senior openly gay person in the Trump administration.

Fox News’ Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Former Vice President Joe Biden once told black voters to “reject” Rev. Jesse Jackson during his first run for the presidency.

Both men attended the 1986 NAACP convention in Baltimore in hopes to garner support ahead of the 1988 presidential election, but as BuzzFeed News reports, Biden made a bold attempt to alienate Jackson from the predominately black audience.

“We must reject the voices in my party who say — and you’ve heard it time and again — ‘Much progress has been made, and now, now we must wait for the Reagan revolution to run its course,’” Biden said.  “But just as I and many other white leaders reject the voices of those who are calling for caution, you must reject the voices in this movement who tell black Americans to go it alone, who tell you that coalitions don’t work anymore, that whites and Catholics and Jews no longer care about the problems of black America, that only black should represent black.”

In 1987, Biden also rejected Jackson as a potential pick for vice president.

““If you’re asking whether I’d choose a black man or woman for a running mate, the answer is yes I would,” Biden said in an interview. “If you’re asking whether I’d choose Jesse Jackson, the answer is no. I would not choose one to be my running mate who did not have experience in government, who hadn’t held elected public office. Jesse Jackson is going to make a significant contribution to this race, but he would not be my choice for vice president.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Rev. Jackson weighed in on Biden’s 2020 candidacy to BuzzFeed News.

“Joe has two things going for him: The polls say he can beat Trump, and he’s worked with Barack and he’s saying that he wants to restore us to that day,” Jackson said. “Well, the challenge is that people are looking forward to a new day and aren’t necessarily looking to the old days.”

When asked if he remembers Biden’s NAACP remarks 30 years later, Jackson softly replied, “Yes, I do.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-NY, and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY, could be facing a major challenger in their next Senate races — Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-NY.

Top Democrats suspect that the freshman congresswoman will primary either Schumer in 2022 or Gillibrand in 2024, according to a report from Axios, Gillibrand, who is currently running for president, just won reelection during the 2018 midterms after vowing she would serve her full six-year term.

If AOC runs against the two party powerhouses — and wins — it wouldn’t be the first time she toppled a big-name Democrat after she defeated leading lawmaker Joe Crowley, who was the chairman of the House Democratic Caucus a member of Congress for nearly 20 years, during the New York primaries in 2018.

Since then, Ocasio-Cortez has become a household name and is leading the effort in promoting the Green New Deal in hopes of tackling climate change.

OCASIO-CORTEZ WANTS TO MAKE IT EASIER TO STUDY MAGIC MUSHROOMS, OTHER PSYCHEDELIC DRUGS

OCASIO-CORTEZ TWEETS CLAIM THAT ‘POWERFUL PEOPLE ARE TRYING TO BRIBE’ TRUMP INTO WAR

With massive support among progressives, the New York representative is seen as a kingmaker during the 2020 election and is weighing her options on who to back in the presidential race.

Senators Bernie Sanders, I-VT, and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass, have so far received the highest praise from the self-described Democratic Socialist.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

She has repeatedly blasted former Vice President Joe Biden, most recently for his previous support for the Hyde Amendment, which outlaws federal funding for abortions.

“If your pride is being a moderate centrist candidate, say that,” Ocasio-Cortez said last week. “Say, ‘I’m proud to be a centrist, I’m proud to be funded by Wall Street. I’m proud to not push as hard as I can on women’s rights.’ Say it, own it, be it, but don’t come out here and say you’re a progressive candidate, but at the same time not support repealing something as basic as the Hyde Amendment.”

Source: Fox News Politics

US Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez turned tail on Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue to avoid a potential Republican challenger as they both marched in the National Puerto Rican Day Parade on Sunday, her political opponent said.

Talk-radio producer Rich Valdes told The Post that he tried to challenge the freshman Democratic congresswoman to a debate on the merits of capitalism versus socialism when he spotted her near West 47th Street.

But Ocasio-Cortez “cut her handshaking short, jerked her hand back and jetted to the other side of the street,” Valdes said.

“She literally ran!” he said.

“I thought this was a good time to try and get a response but I honestly only saw the back of her head as she trotted across the street.”

Valdes’ account was echoed by Guardian Angels founder and radio host Curtis Sliwa, who said the incident unfolded when Valdes approached the progressive firebrand about 12:30 p.m.

“As soon as she saw him she did a pirouette — a spin — and she ran north on Fifth Avenue, ahead of her delegation, just to get away from Rich,” he said.

“I heard Rich yelling after her, ‘OK, AOC. You can run — but you can’t hide!’”

OCASIO-CORTEZ WANTS TO MAKE IT EASIER TO STUDY MAGIC MUSHROOMS, OTHER PSYCHEDELIC DRUGS

Sliwa’s wife, lawyer Nancy Sliwa, also snapped photos that show Valdes walking several steps behind Ocasio-Cortez, then facing the camera with a look of exasperation.

GET THE FOX NEWS APP

On Thursday, Valdes told members of the Queens Village Republican Club that he would move from New Jersey to Ocasio-Cortez’ district, which covers parts of The Bronx and Queens, in an effort to unseat her.

To continue reading on The New York Post, click here.

Source: Fox News Politics

A new poll out Saturday of likely Democratic caucus-goers in Iowa shows Joe Biden in the lead, but with softer support than last December, and a virtual tie for second place among Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Biden garnered 24 percent of those polled, Sanders got 16 percent, Warren held 15 percent and Buttigieg received 14 percent. Kamala Harris trailed with 7 percent, Beto O’Rourke and Amy Klobuchar got 2 percent each and the other candidates barely registered.

BIDEN HOLDS STRONG LEAD IN IOWA POLL; BUTTIGIEG SURGES TO 3RD

“We’re starting to see the people who are planning to caucus start to solidify,” said J. Ann Selzer, president of the Des Moines company that conducted the poll, according to the Des Moines Register. “There’s a lot more commitment than we normally see this early. And some of these candidates who’ve been under the radar start to surface and compete with Joe Biden.”

“We’re starting to see the people who are planning to caucus start to solidify. There’s a lot more commitment than we normally see this early. And some of these candidates who’ve been under the radar start to surface and compete with Joe Biden.”

— J. Ann Selzer, pollster

Buttigieg has surged in the state, the Register reported. In March, the first time he appeared in an Iowa poll, he barely caused a blip among voters.

“It’s like with the vitriol and the hatred and all the bad things people say — he seems to be coming out fresh,” a Buttigieg backer in Cedar Rapids told the Register.

NEW 2020 POLLS: BIDEN TOPS TRUMP IN MICHIGAN, EDGES AHEAD IN TEXAS

Nineteen candidates crisscrossed the state over the weekend in an effort to garner support in the much-hyped first-caucus state. “There’s always been a question mark as to how many can get any real traction,” Selzer told the Register.

The Iowa caucuses are on Feb. 3, 2020.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The poll was conducted June 2-5 by the Des Moines Register, Mediacom and CNN.

Source: Fox News Politics

Biden campaign senior adviser Symone Sanders had a heated clash with MSNBC anchor Chris Jansing on Friday about the Democratic frontrunner’s sudden reversal on the Hyde Amendment, declaring “we’re not going to allow the press the dictate our policy rollout.”

Jansing began by asking Sanders if former Vice President Joe Biden “caved to pressure” in withdrawing his support for the Hyde Amendment, which outlaws federal funding for abortions, late Thursday after his campaign confirmed his support for the amendment on Wednesday. Sanders laughed at the question.

“I think what you heard from the vice president last night was one, the truth, but two, a forceful defense of Roe,” Sanders said, “a forceful and very plain understanding and, frankly, cattle call in saying to everyone, broadcasting to everyone not just in that room but across the country, that we have to understand that one- Roe is the law of the land…”

“But that’s not the question,” Jansing jumped in. “The question was not about Roe v Wade where his position is clear and consistent with the rest of the Democratic candidates, it’s about the Hyde Amendment and before this reversal…”

Sanders, a former CNN commentator, then out-shouted Jansing, rejecting the notion that it was a “reversal” by saying she was with Biden “all day yesterday” and that they had a “thoughtful conversation” about access and health care.

“We are not in the business of allowing the press to dictate our policy rollout,” Sanders told Jansing. “For weeks, we have been having a thoughtful conversation within our campaign about pending health care policy, a part of that conversation, yes, has to do with the Hyde Amendment….”

Jansing grilled Sanders, telling her “the facts behind this position that [Biden] held for 40 years… have not changed.”

“Is your position then that somebody with his experience, his years in the Senate, his years as Vice President did not understand for those 40 years that the Hyde Amendment disproportionately affected poor women and women of color?” Jansing asked.

“Chris, that is absolutely not my position,” Sanders responded before reiterating the “thoughtful conversation” has had.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“We’re not going to preview our campaign strategy and not allow the press the dictate our policy rollout,” the Biden advisor continued. “The vice president is not someone that will just go with the wind with my friends on the left. If that’s the case,  you would have probably heard him come out last night in favor of Medicare-for-all… He is someone who is authentic in his beliefs and I just really think- I’m concerned that folks are editorializing his religious beliefs…”

“I’m not sure how him answering the questions saying he continued to support the Hyde Amendment and less than two days later coming out and saying something different… is the press dictating his rollout,” Jansing shot back.

MSNBC isn’t the only liberal news network that is hammering the Biden campaign over his jarring shift on the Hyde Amendment. CNN anchor Brianna Keilar grilled Biden communications director Kate Bedingfield with a similar line of questioning.

Source: Fox News Politics

Joe Biden’s abrupt about-face over his support for the Hyde Amendment appears to be the latest example of the former vice president reshaping his positions amid pressure from the left including many of his more progressive 2020 rivals.

A day after reaffirming his support for the decades-old ban on federal funds for abortions, the front-runner in the Democratic presidential nomination race made headlines Thursday night as he changed course.

BIDEN REVERSES STANCE ON HYDE AMENDMENT AMID OUTCRY

“If I believe health care is a right, as I do, I can no longer support an amendment that makes that right dependent on someone’s ZIP code,” Biden declared to a cheering crowd at a Democratic National Committee event in Atlanta. “I can’t justify leaving millions of women without the access to care they need, and the ability to exercise their constitutionally protected right.”

Biden’s abandoning of a long-held position was quickly pilloried by the right.

“Biden fully embraces the radical left and supports unlimited taxpayer funding of abortion,” Republican National Committee rapid response director Steve Guest said in an email blast.

Rich Lowry, editor of the conservative National Review, argued that the turnaround was “not the move of a confident front-runner and shows that whatever Biden’s relative moderation compared to the rest of the field, it will be eroded throughout this process.”

Lowry charged that Biden’s “caving sent a very clear message that pro-life Democrats and those with moderate views on abortion will not be tolerated in the Democratic party.”

NEW POLL: MOST WANT TO SEE SOME ABORTION RESTRICTIONS

Even some friendly voices were critical.

University of Chicago Institute of Politics director David Alexrod, who was President Barack Obama’s top political adviser, complimented the former vice president’s strong campaign launch — but tweeted that Biden’s “handling of this Hyde Amendment issue was a mess. Changes of position over a long career are justifiable but should be thoughtfully planned. This was an awkward flip-flop-flip.”

Former Democratic National Committee chairwoman Donna Brazile said on ‘America’s Newsroom’ that “this should give the Biden campaign some early warning that they need to steady themselves as they begin to focus on rolling out more policy decisions or making more changes to their previous positions.”

And the Fox News contributor, who managed Vice President Al Gore’s 2000 White House campaign, noted that Biden isn’t the first presidential candidate to have an “election year epiphany,” saying Biden was still right to “listen to women” and amend his position on the Hyde Amendment.

Biden’s movement on the issue comes as abortion is increasingly in the 2020 spotlight, as Republican-controlled states – from Alabama to Georgia to Missouri – have passed into law measures severely restricting access to abortion. Biden’s decades-old stance in support of the Hyde Amendment had further distanced him from his Democratic nomination rivals.

But Biden’s deputy campaign manager and communications director Kate Bedingfield, in defending her candidate’s change of heart, said in an interview with CNN on Friday that “this is not a decision about politics for him, it’s a decision about health care.”

While not as glaring as his change of stance on the Hyde Amendment, Biden’s also evolved on other topics.

After facing jabs from some of his 2020 Democratic rivals over his handling of the 1991 Senate Judiciary hearing for the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court – when Anita Hill accused Thomas of sexual harassment – his campaign said that Biden “shared his regret” with Hill during a “private discussion” in April.

The campaign added that Biden apologized for what Hill had “endured.”

The former vice president was chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee at the time of the Thomas confirmation process.

When it comes to the hot topic of whether Republican President Trump should face impeachment, Biden’s also evolved in recent weeks. Following last week’s on-camera statement by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, Biden followed in the footsteps of some of his nomination rivals by moving closer to calling for the House of Representatives to start impeachment hearings against Trump.

Biden told Fox News earlier this week that House Democrats probing allegations that the president obstructed justice are getting stonewalled and impeachment proceedings against the president “could come up very quickly.”

On the environment, while he’s long advocated combatting climate change, Biden’s campaign spotlighted the Green New Deal – which is championed by progressives – as the candidate unveiled his own wide-ranging plan earlier this week. Biden’s campaign noted that the Green New Deal served as a “framework” for the former vice president’s proposal.

But Biden’s holding his ground when it comes to the now-controversial 1994 crime bill, which has been criticized in recent years by Democrats who blame the measure for spiking incarcerations, particularly among minorities.

Facing jabs from numerous rivals over the law, which the then-senator from Delaware helped craft, Biden has repeatedly defended the measure.

During a town hall in New Hampshire on Tuesday, Biden told an audience member that “you’ve been conditioned to say” that the 1994 legislation “is a bad bill.”

He emphasized that “only one provision in there that had to do with mandatory sentences that I opposed. And that was a thing called the ‘three strikes and you’re out,’ which I thought was a mistake. But it had a lot of the good things in the bill.”

Terry Shumaker, a New Hampshire-based attorney and former U.S. ambassador who was a top adviser to Bill and Hillary Clinton and who is a top Granite State supporter of Biden, disagrees with the premise that Biden’s bending to the will of the left of the party.

Shumaker said the “vice president’s progressive record speaks for itself.”

Source: Fox News Politics

A new national poll could raise red flags for politicians on both sides of the increasingly polarized debate over abortion.

Three-quarters of Americans want to protect the decades-old landmark Roe v. Wade Supreme Court ruling that legalized abortion nationwide. But the new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll also indicates that a majority want to see restrictions on abortion.

BIDEN REVERSES STANCE ON HYDE AMENDMENT AFTER ABORTION OUTCRY FROM 2020 RIVALS

The survey, conducted May 29-June 4, comes as the divisive issue has taken center stage in recent weeks in the race for the White House — notably, prompting a major reversal this week by former Vice President Joe Biden.

According to the poll, released Friday, roughly 80 percent of those questioned indicated they’re in favor of some kind of limitations — such as allowing abortion only in the first three or six months of a pregnancy, or only in cases of rape, incest or to save the life of the woman.

Just 18 percent supported allowing abortion in any case.

And roughly two-thirds of Americans say they favor requiring women to wait 24 hours after meeting with a health professional before undergoing an abortion, and requiring doctors who perform the procedure to have hospital admitting privileges.

THE LATEST FROM FOX NEWS ON THE ABORTION ISSUE

Those findings could be a warning signal for some Democratic lawmakers and candidates urging a rollback of restrictions — and even suggesting no restrictions against late-term abortions.

This, in response to Republican-authored laws passed recently in Alabama, Georgia, Missouri and elsewhere that severely restrict access to abortions.

Yet the poll also shows those new laws are favored by only a minority of Americans. Just a third questioned said they back so-called “heartbeat laws” that prohibit abortions after heart activity is detected in the womb, typically around six to eight weeks into a pregnancy. That can occur before a woman realizes she’s pregnant.

And less than a quarter support making it a crime for a doctor to perform an abortion, which is included in Alabama’s measure that bans nearly all abortions.

The passage of restrictive abortion laws has energized many of the Democratic presidential contenders, who’ve railed against the measures and vowed to protect Roe v. Wade.

The poll’s release comes on the same week that Biden – the clear front-runner right now in the Democratic presidential nomination race – flip-flopped his position on the Hyde Amendment. Biden dropped his longtime support for the measure that blocks federal funds from being used for most abortions, after a loud chorus of criticism from many of his 2020 Democratic rivals over his support for the Hyde Amendment.

The PBS NewsHour, NPR, and Marist poll used live telephone operators to survey 944 adults nationwide. The survey’s sampling error is plus or minus 4.5 percentage points.

Source: Fox News Politics

Democratic candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden reversed his stance on the Hyde Amendment on Thursday, saying he “can no longer support an amendment that makes” a woman’s right to an abortion “dependent on someone’s ZIP code.”

During his tenure in the Senate, and as recently as Wednesday, Biden had broken from his party’s popular stance and expressed support for the amendment, which prohibits the use of federal funds to subsidize abortions except for cases of rape, incest or when a woman’s life is endangered by a fetus, a notion with which Democrats take issue because of the potential impact on women in marginalized communities.

Biden faced backlash from other Democrats after his campaign held that he supported the amendment despite allegedly telling a woman during a rally that he would repeal it.

2020 DEMS BLAST SUPPORT FOR HYDE AMENDMENT AFTER BIDEN REPORTEDLY OPPOSES REPEAL

“I make no apologies for my last position and I make no apologies for what I’m about to say,” Biden said on Thursday at an event in Atlanta, defending his change of heart. “I can’t justify leaving millions of women without access to the care they need and the ability to exercise their constitutionally protected right.”

Biden blamed Republicans for “denying health care to millions of the … poorest and the most vulnerable Americans by refusing even Medicaid expansion.” He promised that his new universal coverage health care plan would “provide for the full range of health services that women need,” with the “continued expansion of Medicaid and a public option of a Medicare plan.”

NARAL, a pro-choice group that previously slammed Biden over his support for Hyde responded to his remarks on Thursday by saying: “We’re glad that Joe Biden listened to the voices of millions of women and further clarified his position on the Hyde Amendment.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“Let’s be clear, the Hyde Amendment discriminates against all women but particularly poor women and women of color,”  Ilyse Hogue, president of NARAL said in a statement. “At a time where the fundamental freedoms enshrined in Roe [v. Wade] are under attack, we need full-throated allies in our leaders. Leadership is often about listening and learning.

“We’re pleased that Joe Biden has joined the rest of the 2020 Democratic field in coalescing around the party’s core values — support for abortion rights, and the basic truth that reproductive freedom is fundamental to the pursuit of equality and economic security in this country.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., shed some light on her newly formed alliance with Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, in hopes of tackling anti-lobbying legislation, calling their partnership “super-bizarre” but also expressing optimism.

Last week, the lawmakers made waves on social media after finding common ground on banning former Congress members from becoming lobbyists, with Cruz extending a legislative olive branch.

Ocasio-Cortez and Cruz managed to expand their alliance, recruiting Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, and Rep. Chip Roy, R-Texas in their efforts.

Speaking with The Young Turks, the New York congresswoman confirmed that her office is in communication with Cruz’s office.

“Our legislative teams are meeting,” Ocasio-Cortez said. “So we’re going to see how far we can push this.”

The freshman lawmaker explained that she is trying to crack down on “dark money loopholes,” pointing to how only 2 of the 60 percent of former members of the 115th Congress who went on to lobby are “registered lobbyists.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I’m looking forward to seeing where and how far they’d be willing to move on that, but I’m encouraged,” Ocasio-Cortez said. “I think there’s some wiggle room here. It’s super-bizarre, really weird. Never thought in my life that one of my first pushes would be alongside Ted Cruz.”

“I think it really shows what the true spirit of not being partisan is,” she continued. “And that bipartisanship doesn’t mean let’s come together to go to war and lower taxes on the rich. But bipartisanship means, OK, I will swallow all of my distaste in this situation. Because we have found a common interest.”

Source: Fox News Politics

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told senior Democrats on Tuesday that she ultimately wants to see President Trump “in prison,” according to a report.

The speaker reportedly made the remark while defending her stance against impeaching the president in an evening meeting with House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler and other top Democrats, according to Politico.

“I don’t want to see him impeached, I want to see him in prison,” she said, according to multiple Democratic sources familiar with the meeting. House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, Oversight Chairman Elijah Cummings, Ways and Means Chairman Richard Neal and Foreign Affairs Chairman Eliot Engel also reportedly attended the meeting.

“I don’t want to see him impeached, I want to see him in prison.”

— Remark attributed to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, according to a report

IMPEACHMENT DAM BREAKING AS PELOSI DEPUTIES TIP HAND: ‘WE’VE ALREADY BEGUN’

Pelosi wants to hold the president accountable, the sources said, but thinks voters should get him out of office in 2020, after which he could possibly face criminal charges.

Nadler and dozens of Democrats have been pressing Pelosi to hold impeachment hearings, but the speaker reportedly believes there should be public and bipartisan support to launch the process, according to Politico.

Pelosi has previously said the president’s actions “are villainous to the Constitution of the United States.”

A Pelosi spokesperson told the New York Post the lawmakers “had a productive meeting about the state of play with the Mueller report. They agreed to keep all options on the table and continue to move forward with an aggressive hearing and legislative strategy, as early as next week, to address the president’s corruption and abuses of power uncovered in the report.”

The spokesperson did not directly address whether Pelosi made the remark about Trump that was attributed to her.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The House will hold hearings next week “focused on the alleged crimes and other misconduct laid out in Special Counsel Robert Mueller‘s report.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Presidential candidate Kirsten Gillibrand rolled out her plan to legalize pot and expunge all records for non-violent marijuana convictions, she announced on Wednesday.

Gillibrand’s plan focuses on rehabilitating “communities disproportionately harmed by marijuana laws,” predominantly African-American and Hispanic, she said in a post on Medium, by decriminalizing the use of the drug and funneling tax revenue from non-prescription marijuana products into support programs for formerly incarcerated individuals jailed for marijuana-related charges.

‘WE’VE INVITED YOU’: CHRIS WALLACE SPARS WITH GILLIBRAND OVER ABORTION CONTROVERSY

Data showed that blacks were 8.1 times more likely to be arrested and Hispanics five times more likely to be arrested in 2017 than their white counterparts, according to the Data Collaborative for Justice at John Jay College.

“These findings and the data behind them provide an empirical foundation for important policy conversations underway in New York State about decriminalization and legalization of marijuana, such as how to reduce racial differences in arrest rates,” the report said.

Senator Gillibrand, D-N.Y., hopes to “lift up communities held down for generations by unjust marijuana laws,” and “give small businesses in underserved communities access to capital and technical assistance through marijuana-specific programs,” she said.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Her plan also includes expanding research for medical marijuana use to combat the opioid addiction epidemic and to include coverage for medical marijuana in all private health insurance plans, as well as federal programs such as the VA, Medicare, and Medicaid.

Source: Fox News Politics

NYC mayor Bill de Blasio was the subject of mockery on Wednesday after attempting to slam his Democratic rival former Vice President Joe Biden over a key issue on abortion.

Biden ruffled feathers among progressives after he said he supports the Hyde Amendment, which outlaws federally funded abortions with exceptions to rape, incest, and life of the mother. Last month, however, Biden appeared committed to abolishing the amendment, a position that nearly all the prominent 2020 candidates have taken.

On Wednesday, Biden’s camp clarified the former VP’s position on the issue has not changed, and he “misheard” the question when asked if he supports the Hyde Amendment.

However, before Biden was able to correct the record, many seized on Biden’s seeming backflip on a key issue.

New York City Mayor — and 2020 Democrat hopeful — Bill de Blasio was one of those who tried to score some points off Biden, however things did not work out quite as he would have liked.

“The Hyde Amendment only hurts low income women, especially women of color. If you don’t support repeal, you shouldn’t be the Democratic nominee,” de Blasio tweeted.

He then followed up by writing: “And when it comes to supporting American women on issues like repealing the Hyde Amendment, @JoeBiden is Dr. Jekyll.”

Many on Twitter, however, fact-checked the NYC mayor, telling him that Dr. Jekyll was “the good one” from the classic Robert Louis Stevenson novel.

The literary confused capped off a rough few days for de Blasio, who was the subject of President Trump’s ire on Twitter Monday morning.

While taking aim at London Mayor Sadiq Khan, Trump described the British politician as the “twin” of de Blasio “except shorter.”

The New York mayor, a Trump critic himself, is 6’5. Khan is 5’6.

Source: Fox News Politics

Democratic presidential candidate John Delaney is warning that the “Medicare-for-all” bill supported by many of his rivals for the 2020 nomination “is bad policy and bad politics and will help get Donald Trump re-elected.”

In an interview Wednesday, the long-shot candidate also warned about “intolerance to different ideas” inside the party tent after Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez recently told him to “sashay away” over his health care stance.

And pouring more fuel on his fiery fight with the left flank of the party, Delaney’s campaign said Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders of Vermont – a longtime proponent of Medicare-for-all – “has no business being the nominee for the Democratic Party.”

NO ROOM FOR MODERATES IN 2020 DEMOCRATIC FIELD?

The statements amount to Delaney’s latest push to warn against the party’s embrace of more liberal policies and candidates. But it’s a lonely road.

The former three-term congressman from Maryland, who’s far more moderate than most of the other nearly two-dozen Democratic White House hopefuls, sparked a chorus of boos from the audience this past weekend at the California Democrats’ annual convention when he declared that “Medicare-for-all may sound good, but it’s actually not good policy, nor is it good politics.”

AOC TELLS DELANEY TO “SASHAY AWAY”

Ocasio-Cortez then took aim at Delaney, saying it was time for him to “sashay away.”

“Since there’s so many people running for President (& not enough for Senate), instead of obsessing over who‘s a ‘frontrunner,’ maybe we can start w some general eliminations,” Ocasio-Cortez wrote. “This awful, untrue line got boo’ed for a full minute. John Delaney, thank you but please sashay away.”

The next day, Delaney challenged the congresswoman to debate him on the issue.

“Hey @AOC, we have the same goal, universal healthcare for everyone, we just have different ways of getting there. Healthcare is the #1 issue for voters, so let’s debate the way forward. Any show of your choosing. Healthcare is too important for tweets, we need real discussion,” he wrote on Twitter.

Delaney told Fox News on Wednesday that “I’ve got nothing against her and I don’t think I’ve said a word about her since she’s been elected. And she basically told me to quit the race because she disagrees with my approach to create universal health care. So I simply said ‘if you feel this strongly about it, and since health care is the number one issue affecting the American people, why don’t we debate it.’”

After Ocasio-Cortez turned down his invitation to face off, Delaney said: “I was disappointed she didn’t do it because I think you’ve got to back your words up.”

And he warned that “intolerance to different ideas is part of the problem. And that is something I think that is getting very dangerous and concerning in the Democratic Party right now.”

He also argued that having a Democratic nominee who supports Medicare-for-all “makes it really hard” to defeat Republican President Trump in next year’s general election.

“In the Medicare for all bill, it makes private insurance illegal. And there’s 150 million Americans who have private insurance and most of them like it. And I think the Republicans are not going to be afraid to talk about this and they’re going to pound it over the American people’s heads and make them afraid that the  Democrats are going to make them lose their health insurance, and tell them that they’ve got to go on a government website to get their health insurance,” he said.

Delaney touted his health care plan, highlighting it’s “the largest expansion of government health care since the creation of Medicare. It gives every single American health care as a right and they get it for free. But what it does also do is allow them if they want to have choices and keep their private insurance. And because of that difference, I’m being told to leave the debate.”

While Delaney chided fellow Democrats for intolerance, his campaign said it was time for Sanders to go.

“I’m sure Sen. Sanders is a nice guy, but he has no business being the nominee for the Democratic Party. Is there really a world where anyone thinks that putting Sanders at the top of the ticket makes it easier to beat Donald Trump? If that’s the goal, which it should be, Sanders is the wrong choice,” Delaney press secretary Michael Hopkins said.

Some critics have charged that Delaney, a long-shot for the nomination who’s been running for the White House for nearly two years, was looking to get booed at the California Democratic Party convention in order to grab some attention, which is exactly what happened.

But Delaney pushed back against such criticism, noting “I wrote a book a year and a half ago that laid out my whole health care plan and why single payer is a bad way to go.”

Delaney, who brings up the issue of health care often during campaign stops, said that “this is not like some new thing I decided to talk about.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Hours before he headlines two campaign fundraising events in Boston on Wednesday, former Vice President Joe Biden pushed back against criticism by some of his top rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination for holding “high dollar functions” hosted by “corporate lobbyists.”

Biden, the clear front-runner right now in the Democratic nomination race, told Fox News “this idea of Biden’s the big donor guy, come on.”

SANDERS TARGETS BIDEN OVER TOP-DOLLAR FUNDRAISERS

Twice in the past couple of weeks, Sen. Bernie Sanders and his presidential campaign took aim at Biden’s top-dollar fundraising events from coast to coast.

In a fundraising email to supporters last week, Sanders spotlighted a campaign trip to Nevada that he made a day later.

“But I am not going to Nevada to attend a fundraiser hosted by a corporate CEO on the Las Vegas strip — I am going to Nevada to attend a rally with supporters and a town hall on immigration,” the populist independent senator from Vermont said.

While not mentioning Biden by name, it was clear Sanders was referring to the former vice president, who campaigned in Nevada three weeks ago. On that trip, Biden held a fundraiser at the Las Vegas Strip that was hosted by MGM Resorts CEO Jim Murren, a Republican. The CEO and other top executives of William Hill, the world’s biggest bookmaker, also co-hosted the fundraiser.

In a separate fundraising email titled “We risk falling behind” that was sent to supporters days earlier, Sanders campaign manager Faiz Shakir wrote that Biden’s “raising huge sums of money at large fundraising events all across the country. And these are not grassroots fundraising events.”

He spotlighted that “these are high-dollar functions hosted and attended by corporate lobbyists, health care executives, a Republican casino-CEO, and a union-busting lawyer among others.”

WARREN SLAMS BIDEN OVER ‘SWANKY’ FUNDRAISER

Another leading Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, also ripped Biden over his fundraisers. In an email to supporters in late April, the progressive senator from Massachusetts noted that the former vice president “hosted a swanky private fundraiser for wealthy donors at the home of the guy who runs Comcast’s lobbying shop.”

Biden, after a campaign event Tuesday in Berlin, New Hampshire, pushed back.

“The stuff about Biden with the big contributors,” Biden told Fox News. “My lord, this idea of Biden’s the big donor guy, come on. I’ve eschewed any relationship with any PACs.”

And touting his grassroots contributions, Biden appeared to reveal for the first time the number of individual donors to his campaign, saying “we’ve had over 300,000 individual contributors. Average contribution of these is under $200.”

Biden’s been raising big bucks through small-dollar online donations – his campaign recently touted their online contributions and said those kinds of contributions made up the lion’s share of the whopping $6.3 million raised in the 24 hours after the former vice president announced his candidacy last month.

But Biden’s also been holding some high-profile, high-end fundraisers. On his first night as a White House contender, he raised $700,000 at the Philadelphia home of a Comcast executive. He also hauled in big bucks at a Hollywood finance event and at two Florida fundraisers last month.

The former vice president’s expected to hold two major fundraisers in New York City on June 17, sources close to Biden’s inner circle told Fox News.

Fundraising was far from then-Sen. Biden’s wheelhouse in his unsuccessful White House runs in the 1988 and 2008 presidential cycles. But so far, the third time appears to be the charm, as Biden’s raking in big bucks both at traditional fundraisers with deep-pocketed donors — which he’s opened up to media coverage in a move for transparency — as well as through online contributions.

BIDEN SAYS HOUSE PUSH FOR IMPEACHMENT COULD COME ‘VERY QUICKLY’

The former vice president’s far from the only Democratic presidential candidate courting top donors. Sens. Cory Booker of New Jersey, Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Kamala Harris of California and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota are also holding closed-door finance events. And South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, a one-time long-shot who’s surged in recent months, is also competing for big money.

Sanders reportedly has decided to now hold in-person fundraising events and has hired an official to oversee such finance events.

Since jumping into the race in late April, Biden’s increasingly taken incoming fire from Sanders, Warren, and some of the other candidates in the historically enormous field of two-dozen Democratic White House contenders. Besides fundraising, Biden’s been criticized for his past support of free trade deals, for his 2002 vote in support of the Iraq War, and for taking an alleged “middle ground” approach to combating climate change.

Asked if he would return fire, Biden told Fox News: “I think the worst thing we could do is get into a match where we’re going after each other in the Democratic Party. So I’m going to try my best not to be negative relative to my opponents.”

And he said that “just like I’m not going to go down to Trump’s level when he starts his attacks, I’m not going to go down to anybody else’s level when they start attacks.”

But he said he would respond at times to “set the facts straight.” He added, “I’ll respond to assertions. I’m not likely to go and point out what they’re doing, which is sometimes different than what they say.”

Before heading to Boston, Biden made a last stop Wednesday morning in the first-in-the-nation presidential primary state of  New Hampshire. The former vice president chatted with patrons at Chez Vachon, a Manchester eatery that’s a must stop for White House contenders. Biden was accompanied by influential state senator Lou D’Allesandro, a longtime friend of the former vice president.

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump early Wednesday called out the “corrupt media” for reporting on the paltry protester turnout during his trip to the U.K. and said if there was actually “fair” news accounts about his success in office, he would be dominating in polls.

The president unleashed Twitter attacks on Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, former Vice President Joe Biden and even actress and singer Bette Midler. A couple of the broadsides came in about 1 a.m. local time in London.

“I kept hearing that there would be “massive” rallies against me in the UK, but it was quite the opposite. The big crowds, which the Corrupt Media hates to show, were those that gathered in support of the USA and me,” he posted.

Thousands of Londoners lined the streets Tuesday to protest his visit with the queen, including those carrying a giant baby blimp Trump.

TRUMP SUPPORTER POPS MASSIVE BALLOON DEPICTING POTUS AS BABY AT UK PROTESTS

TRUMP OPENS UP ON REPORTED ‘NASTY’ COMMENT ABOUT MEGHAN MARKLE

Protesters were reportedly kept away from the president during his visit with Theresa May on Downing Street and with the queen at Buckingham Palace, according to The Guardian.

Trump’s trip, even though largely ceremonial, has been shrouded in controversy. He traded barbs with London Mayor Sadiq Khan, whom he called a “stone cold loser,” before the visit and even called Meghan Markle “nasty” after hearing negative comments she made about him before the 2016 election. He later told Piers Morgan he didn’t mean she was nasty, but that the comments she made were nasty.

Trump will pay his respects Wednesday to American service members and allies who helped rescue Europe from Nazi Germany, as he enters the midway point of his European visit.

Trump will join Queen Elizabeth II and Prime Minister Theresa May at Portsmouth Naval Base, which served as a key launch pad for the forces that would land on Normandy. It will be the first of two events commemorating the 75th anniversary of D-Day that Trump is attending this week.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Trump is on a week-long tour of the U.K. and France.

The president said in a news conference Tuesday he is grateful for the warm welcome he received from the royal family and prime minister as “we remember the heroes who laid down their lives to rescue civilization itself.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report 

Source: Fox News Politics

Reporter Jake Tapper and his panel on Tuesday took presidential candidate Joe Biden to task over his 30-year-old claim that he marched during the civil rights movement.

“More than once” Biden’s advisors reminded him during 1988 presidential campaign that he, in fact, had not marched for civil rights, but Biden continued to make the claim to voters, The New York Times reported.

“That is really, really weird,” Tapper commented on the report.

BIDEN, NOW 76, ATTACKED HIS OLDER OPPONENT’S AGE DURING 1972 SENATE RUN

“When he gets really comfortable out on the stump,” Jeff Zeleny, a CNN reporter, told Tapper, “he has tended to embellish.” He added that Biden’s aides said, “he was in office marching for the idea of civil rights.”

CNN anchor Jake Tapper hosts "The Lead."<br />
​​​​”></picture></div>
<div class=

CNN anchor Jake Tapper hosts “The Lead.”<br>
​​​​ (Reuters)

“That’s not what the word marching means,” Tapper laughed in response.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In the age of social media, Zeleny said, Biden would not be able to get away with the same embellishments reported in The New York Times story. “So that’s his big challenge,” he added, explaining that those lies were why Biden ended up having to drop out of the race before the Iowa caucuses – “because he plagiarized a speech.”

Source: Fox News Politics

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-MD, downplayed the push for President Trump‘s impeachment on Tuesday and suggested it’s the media that’s actually fanning the flames.

During an appearance on CNN, Hoyer was asked if his stance on impeachment has shifted since the release of the Mueller report in April. At the time, he said impeachment was “not worthwhile.”

CNN anchor Wolf Blitzer then asked why impeachment may be “worth while” now versus April, noting that many in the party are ramping up pressure to impeach the president, but Hoyer pushed back.

“Wolf, I know you and other reporters keep asking and they want us to say we’re for impeachment,” Hoyer told “The Situation Room” anchor. “What we are for is continuing our investigations, making sure that the administration gives us the information we are constitutionally authorized to receive.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Hoyer echoed Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif, saying they will go “where the facts” take them. Blitzer, however, clarified that he wasn’t pushing for anything.

“I just want to point out, I’m not asking you to do anything or support anything, I’m just asking some questions, trying to get precise information,” Blitzer defended himself.

Hoyer’s comments came after South Carolina Rep. Jim Clyburn, the third-highest-ranking Democrat in the House, said in an interview Sunday that he believes impeachment proceedings ultimately will be launched against Trump at some point in the future. He suggested Democrats are already laying the groundwork in Congress.

“I think we’ve already begun,” Clyburn said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”  “We’ve got all of these committees doing their work, we’re having hearings.”

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump hosted a dinner for Prince Charles and Duchess of Cornwall Camilla Parker Bowles on Tuesday night at Winfield House, a mansion in London which is the official residence of the United States ambassador to the United Kingdom.

The president and the first lady have been staying at Winfield House during their London trip, which started on Monday.

About 60 people, including Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, National Security Adviser John Bolton, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders and former U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair attended.

PRESIDENT TRUMP, QUEEN ELIZABETH REAFFIRM CLOSE TIES BETWEEN US AND UK, COMMEMORATE D-DAY INVASION AT BANQUET

The president was seated at a table in between exiting Prime Minister Theresa May and Prince Charles. The first lady sat at another table, with May’s husband, Philip, and Duchess Camilla.

President Trump, s Prince Charles and White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders during the return dinner at Winfield House. 

President Trump, s Prince Charles and White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders during the return dinner at Winfield House.  (Chris Jackson/Pool Photo via AP)

The president and the first lady did not address the media during Tuesday night’s event. The royals in attendance made no remarks, either.

Earlier Tuesday, Trump and the first lady toured the Churchill War Rooms with the prime minister and her husband. British leaders used the bunkers to plot strategy during World War II.

Donald and Melania Trump greet Prince Charles and Camilla.

Donald and Melania Trump greet Prince Charles and Camilla. (Chris Jackson/Pool Photo via AP)

The Trumps played host and hostess in London about 24 hours after the royals hosted them. The president capped off the first day of his London visit Monday by dining with Queen Elizabeth and other members of the royal family at a lavish state banquet at Buckingham Palace.

The banquet ended a tumultuous and busy day that saw the president taking in the sights of the British capital while leveling insults at London Mayor Sadiq Khan.

Both Trump and the queen offered formal toasts ahead of that dinner.

From left, President Trump, Queen Elizabeth II, first lady Melania Trump, Prince Charles and Camilla on Monday.

From left, President Trump, Queen Elizabeth II, first lady Melania Trump, Prince Charles and Camilla on Monday. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, Pool)

“Visits by American presidents always remind us of the close and lasting relationship between the United Kingdom and the United States,” Queen Elizabeth said in her toast, before referencing the Allied mission on D-Day.

Trump is set to travel to Normandy later this week to commemorate 75 years since the Allied invasion of France.

In his toast on Monday night, Trump reaffirmed the close ties between London and Washington – noting the countries’ joint effort in defeating Nazi Germany.

TRUMP CALLS LONDON’S MAYOR ‘THE TWIN OF DE BLASIO, EXCEPT SHORTER’

The state dinner on Monday was attended by a number of members of the royal family, the British government and the Trump administration.

The 'Trump Baby' blimp was inflated in Parliament Square in central London as people gathered to demonstrate against the state visit of President Donald Trump, Tuesday, June 4, 2019. Trump joined British Prime Minister Theresa May for a day of talks on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

The ‘Trump Baby’ blimp was inflated in Parliament Square in central London as people gathered to demonstrate against the state visit of President Donald Trump, Tuesday, June 4, 2019. Trump joined British Prime Minister Theresa May for a day of talks on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

Trump was also greeted by protesters during his trip. Thousands demonstrated on Tuesday in London’s government district as Trump met May nearby. Trump described the thousands of people who protested in London against his visit to Britain as a “small protest,” adding that media reports of a much larger protest are “fake news.”

May praised the “precious and profound” U.S.-U.K. special relationship on Tuesday but acknowledged differences with Trump on issues including Iran and climate change.

Speaking alongside Trump at a news conference in London, May mentioned Britain’s continued support for the Paris agreement on climate change, which Trump has rejected. She also said the two nations differ on how to limit the threat from Iran with the U.K. still supports an international agreement to suppress Tehran’s nuclear ambitions while Trump has pulled the U.S. from the deal.

The president and first lady will stay in the U.K. through Wednesday. The trip comes at a tumultuous time in British politics, with May due to step down on Friday.

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Trump is scheduled to make his first presidential visit to Ireland on Wednesday, spending two nights at his golf club in Doonbeg, which sits above the Atlantic. After Dublin balked at holding a meeting in the city, a deal was struck for Trump to meet Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar at the VIP lounge at Shannon Airport, hardly the grand setting usually afforded a meeting of world leaders.

Fox News’ Matt Leach, Andrew O’Reilly and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Former Vice President Joe Biden, in an interview Tuesday in New Hampshire, said House Democrats probing allegations that President Trump obstructed justice are getting stonewalled and impeachment proceedings against the president “could come up very quickly.”

And Biden said there may be “no alternative” but to move toward an impeachment hearing as congressional Democrats vow to dig into the findings from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia report.

WHITE HOUSE TELLS TOP EX-AIDES NOT TO COMPLY WITH HOUSE SUBPOENAS

The comments amount to some of Biden’s strongest language to date on the controversial impeachment issue, as many 2020 rivals urge proceedings to begin without delay. The clear front-runner in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, Biden made the comments Tuesday in an interview following a campaign event in the first-in-the-nation primary state of New Hampshire.

The former vice president also addressed the attacks he’s been weathering of late from some rivals for the Democratic nomination.

“I’m not going to go down to anybody else’s level when they start attacks,” he said, when asked about the jabs. But he added “I’ll set the facts straight” and he specifically pushed back against criticism from a top rival – Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont – over his big-dollar fundraisers.

2020 NOMINATION RIVALS TAKE AIM AT FRONT-RUNNER BIDEN

Biden was in New Hampshire as it emerged that the White House had instructed two former aides, Hope Hicks and Annie Donaldson, to defy congressional subpoenas that sought documents related to allegations that Trump obstructed justice. It was the latest case of the White House pushing back against investigators from the Democrat-controlled House.

Biden said House Democrats are getting stonewalled and argued they have a “responsibility to move if in fact they are they are unable to get the data that is totally within their power to be able to subpoena before the Congress to make a judgment.”

He added: “And if they stonewall that, the only other constitutional avenue for them is impeachment.”

Mueller’s public statement last week stressing that his report did not exonerate the president of obstruction of justice accusations has triggered an avalanche of calls from Democrats to begin impeachment proceedings against Trump. But Biden has been more reluctant to join the calls.

One of his top rivals in the race, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, last week called for the House to begin impeachment proceedings.

“I believe the Judiciary Committee should begin impeachment inquiries,” Sanders said at a rally in Nevada. “That is inquiries, not impeachment, to determine whether or not Trump has committed impeachable offenses.”

Other 2020 candidates have explicitly called on Congress to move ahead with impeachment now. Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., said there is a “legal and moral obligation to begin impeachment proceedings immediately.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., described Mueller’s statement as “an impeachment referral,” and said that Congress should act on it.

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., also compared Mueller’s remarks to an “impeachment referral,” and said, “We need to start impeachment proceedings. It’s our constitutional obligation.”

SWALWELL ON IMPEACHMENT: ‘I THINK WE’RE ULTIMATELY ENDING UP THERE’

Democrats in the House are suggesting they believe the party will eventually try to impeach Trump. South Carolina Rep. Jim Clyburn, the third-highest-ranking Democrat in the House, said in an interview on CNN Sunday that he believes impeachment proceedings ultimately will be launched against Trump at some point in the future. He suggested Democrats are already laying the groundwork in Congress, though later seemed to walk his comments back.

In a radio interview last week, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., whose committee would lead impeachment proceedings, said “there certainly is” justification for Congress to begin impeachment proceedings against Trump, but said it was critical for the American public to be on board before launching the process.

Mueller’s statement has put renewed pressure on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who has resisted the calls and questioned the political wisdom of moving forward. Pelosi has been non-committal about impeachment and said last week, “Many constituents want to impeach the president. But we want to do what is right and what gets results.”

Even if they impeach, Democrats do not appear to have the votes in the Senate – where a supermajority is required and Republicans have control – to remove Trump from office.

Biden’s appearance in New Hampshire comes three days after he was indirectly attacked by some of his rivals who were campaigning in California.

With Biden 2,500 miles away – speaking to the Human Rights Campaign annual gala in Ohio – several of the 14 Democratic presidential candidates attending the California Democratic Party’s annual convention took aim at the former vice president.

2020 DEMOCRATS TAKE AIM AT BIDEN AT CALIFORNIA CONVENTION

The verbal fireworks in San Francisco were the latest sign that the left wing of the Democratic Party is in no mood to see Biden – derided by many of them as a centrist establishment Democrat – become the party’s standard-bearer in 2020

Among those directly jabbing at Biden were  Sanders, Warren, and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

“We will not defeat Donald Trump unless we bring excitement and energy into the campaign,” declared Sanders, taking some of his strongest shots to date at Biden, without naming him.

“We cannot go back to the old ways,” argued Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont who’s making a second straight run for the Democratic nomination.

Responding to those critiques, and other sniping against Biden’s claim that Republicans would be amenable to compromise with Trump out of the White House, the former vice president told the audience in Berlin that “I’m not going about going back to the past. I’m talking about avoiding a terrible future if we do not figure out how to make this work. The Republicans are my opponents, they’re not my enemy.”

And he warned “there’s people who say that you can’t work with the other side. Well, if that’s the case, prepare your children for a totally different U.S. A totally different world. I don’t believe it.”

In his interview, Biden said, “I think the worst thing we could do is get into a match where we’re going after each other in the Democratic Party. So I’m going to try my best not to be negative relative to my opponents.”

Asked if he’ll respond to attacks during the upcoming Democratic primary debates, Biden said in the interview that “It depends. Just like I’m not going to go down to Trump’s level when he starts his attacks, I’m not going to go down to anybody else’s level when they start attacks.”

SANDERS SLAMS BIDEN FOR SWANY FUNDRAISERS

But he said he would set the record straight and pushed back against repeated jabs from Sanders over Biden’s top-dollar fundraisers.

“The stuff about Biden with the big contributors. We’ve had over 300,000 individual contributors. Average contribution of these is under $200,” Biden revealed as he touted his grassroots on-line contributions.“I’ve taken money as high as $2,800 from people. But my lord, this idea of Biden’s the big donor guy, come on. I’ve eschewed any relationship with any PACs.”

And taking aim at some of his rivals, he added “I’ll respond to assertions. I’m not likely to go and point out what they’re doing, which is sometimes different than what they say.”

Fox News’ Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld may be it when it comes to Republicans primary-challenging President Trump for the 2020 GOP nomination.

Popular two-term Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan – who had flirted with a White House run and this spring made stops in Iowa and New Hampshire – is now out of the running.

LARRY HOGAN SAYS NO TO 2020 PRIMARY CHALLENGE AGAINST TRUMP

“I truly appreciate all of the encouragement I received from people around the nation urging me to consider making a run for President in 2020. However, I will not be a candidate,” Hogan tweeted on Saturday.

One day earlier, another vocal Trump critic appeared to signal he was shying away from taking on the president in the primaries.

“I don’t see a way to get there,” former two-term Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a senior CNN political commentator, said Friday in an appearance on the cable news network.

“Right now, there’s no path,” he acknowledged.

KASICH: ‘RIGHT NOW, THERE’S NOT PATH’

Still, top Kasich political adviser and veteran GOP consultant John Weaver told Fox News minutes later that “nothing has changed … every day the tables could turn.”

And the former governor himself took to Twitter hours later to temper his original comments, saying “that while the path looks tough, all of my options are on the table.”

Kasich’s second place finish in the 2016 New Hampshire Republican primary behind Trump turned the one-time longshot for the nomination into a potential contender that year. But in the ensuing months, the only primary he was able to win was in his home state.

Kasich never endorsed Trump during the 2016 campaign, even after Trump locked up the nomination. And Kasich didn’t attend that summer’s Republican nominating convention, even though it took place in Cleveland, in his home state of Ohio. Since Trump’s entered the White House, Kasich’s remained a vocal critic of the president.

A Pew Research Center poll conducted April 29-May 13 indicated that 43 percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents wanted to see a primary challenge against the president.

But public opinion surveys also indicate that Trump remains extremely popular among Republican voters.

“Among most Republicans it’s seen as a fool’s errand,” said former New Hampshire Gov. John H. Sununu, who served as chief of staff to President George H.W. Bush.

“The president’s got very strong support among Republicans and it appears to be getting stronger and stronger every day,” explained Sununu, a Fox News contributor.

Ryan Williams, a veteran GOP consultant and spokesman for Mitt Romney’s 2012 presidential election, predicted that “President Trump is all but assured the Republican nomination and any potential Republican challenger should understand that.”

“If you’re an incumbent politician like Gov. Hogan or a former politician with a TV gig like Gov. Kasich, I think you have to take a look at the numbers and see that this would be a fruitless endeavor to challenge him,” explained Williams.

He added that unlike Hogan and Kasich, “for someone like Gov. Weld, who’s been out of politics for a few years, it’s a no lose situation for him. He can run, have fun. He won’t win but in the process, he won’t damage himself.”

Weld, who officially launched his primary challenge in April after exploring a bid for two months, says time’s on his side

“The president is just abdicating his responsibility as president. I think that is so outrageous that I think it’s going to sink in over time in the consciousness of the American people that we can’t have this guy doing this job,” he charged in a recent interview with C-SPAN.

And Bill Kristol, a leader of the never-Trump movement, also isn’t giving up.

“I have a high regard for Larry Hogan, and Marylanders are lucky to have him as governor. Needless to say, the fight for our party and our country will continue,” he wrote on Twitter following Hogan’s announcement on Saturday.

And Kristol added “Aut inveniam viam aut faciam,” which is Latin for “I shall either find a way or make one.”

Source: Fox News Politics


Current track

Title

Artist